Business Process

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Business Process

The series of activities undertaken to create a product or deliver a service. Companies often lay down specific rules for business process to ensure activities are completed in an organized and efficient manner. Business process may involve division of labor between multiple persons and/or technologies. For example, in a publishing company, one person may write material, a second may edit it, a third may add graphics, and a fourth may print it. Business process is also called business function.
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non-exclusive right to use the software unified business process management suite, weblogic suite, soa suite for oracle middleware, work on the implementation of the bank software for building distributed business processes and managing data flows between information systems based on oracle software
Business Process Management is focused on managing change and improves business processes. Business Process Management unites different disciplines: previous process modeling, simulation, workflow, Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) and Business-to-Business Integration (B2B) in one standard.
Especially, in order to improve the quality of business processes with the high, consistent and predictable efficiency, it is so important for the business process knowledge to be discovered from runtime execution logs of business process models.
Worksoft provides the industry's leading platform for automated business process validation, ensuring that business processes continue to work even when mission- critical enterprise systems change.
(2005) stated that business processes and business rules modelling, simulation and implementation measures are considered to be one of the most effective ways to increase the efficiency of business processes and productivity.
Davenport (1993) defined a business process as "a structured, measured set of activities designed to produce a specific output for a particular customer or market." The Association of Business Process Management Professionals (ABPMP, 2009) defines a process as a "set of activities or behaviors performed by humans or machines to achieve one or more goal." Hammer and Champy (1993) defined BPM as "a complete end-to-end set of activities that together create value for the customer." Further, Smith and Fingar (2003) describe BPM as "not only does it encompass the discovery, design and development of business processes, but also the executive, administrative and supervisory control over them to ensure that they remain compliant with business objectives for the delight of customers."
The UC Strategies Experts were headed in the right direction when they defined unified communications as "communications integrated to optimize business processes." That is a fundamental perspective of the technology for making both person-to-person and process-to-person communication applications more interoperable and integrated.
said that OpenText (NASDAQ: OTEX) is embedding Birst's business intelligence platform within its business process applications to help customers gain the information and analysis they need to optimize their business processes.
It encompasses business process services for horizontal as well as vertical business processes through a feature-rich platform for delivering automated business outcomes.
Therefore, contemporary organisations aim to automate their business processes to improve operational efficiency, reduce costs, improve the quality of customer service and reduce the probability of human error.
The real application of a process approach enables organizations especially to [17], [1]: (1) focus on goals and process outputs regardless of different organizational units, (2) define the intra-organizational market of internal suppliers and customers (in many organizations based on a service-oriented architecture), whose basis are intra-business service-level agreements between the process owners (managers responsible for individual business processes), (3) identify critical places of value creation for customers faster, as in the case of hierarchical functional structures, (4) optimize cost structures concerning products and services.
This combination of Pegasystems' industry-leading BPM solutions and Ness' full spectrum of consulting, engineering and professional services will help clients create more efficiency around business processes and improve customer service.

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