Business Process

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Business Process

The series of activities undertaken to create a product or deliver a service. Companies often lay down specific rules for business process to ensure activities are completed in an organized and efficient manner. Business process may involve division of labor between multiple persons and/or technologies. For example, in a publishing company, one person may write material, a second may edit it, a third may add graphics, and a fourth may print it. Business process is also called business function.
References in periodicals archive ?
products are software, business methods, and diagnostic tests.
controversy over the patentability of business methods arise at this
The inventions protected by the Interval Licensing patents are not strictly business methods.
They fretted that opening the door too wide to patents on business methods would stifle--not promote--innovation and competition.
In the Bilski concurrence, Stevens stated that business methods should not be patentable.
In Europe, business methods as such are not considered inventions of the kind for which a patent may be granted.
Signature Financial Group that business methods are patent eligible if they satisfied the other requirements of the Patent Act.
BNA said it is written to help the patent practitioner draft the broadest possible patent that can sustain a validity challenge by applying lessons directly from the case law, including pitfalls related to electrical patents, chemical and pharmaceutical patents and biotechnology patents as well as software, e-commerce, Internet, and business methods patents.
In so holding, the court rejected its State Street Bank decision, which had first established that business methods are patentable (State St.
Veteran patent attorneys from both prosecution and litigation practices and corporate and private practice update the 1995 first edition with new chapters on patent filing trends for software and business methods, maximizing success with patent examiners, drafting a patent specification that meets requirements outside of the US, and post-State Street Bank court cases involving business method patents.
The Federal Circuit in State Street held "[s]ince the 1952 Patent Act, business methods have been, and should have been, subject to the same legal requirements for patentability as applied to any other process or method.
Unlike typical mechanical or technology inventions, there generally is very little in printed publications about business methods and it is very difficult to prove that they were in use or on sale before the critical date.