Bureaucrat


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Bureaucrat

An administrator, especially of a government or large corporation. A bureaucrat is charged with enforcing the rules and ensuring that proper procedures are followed. The word has a negative connotation because bureaucrats are often thought to slow down progress or innovation. However, because bureaucrats help create a level playing field, Max Weber argued that they are necessary for the rule of law to function.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the bureaucrats coordinate their bribes and choose a common bribe, b, then the optimal bribe maximizes the representative bureaucrat's income, now given by
If this is a concession in this phase of the loud NAB drive to root out corruption, even bigger favours are being extended in general to the bureaucrats, whose smooth functioning has to be ensured for the government's working.
The sources said that two bureaucrats allegedly put pressure to do away with case of illegal import of vehicles from Qatar and when Shaukat Ali allegedly refused to follow their directions, they used their influence and removed him from his post.
They maintained that the former bureaucrat did everything she could for the area, including supporting construction of bridges over the rivers.
Doing business is still highly complex in India and bureaucrats, with their understanding of the Indian system, can prove to be invaluable to private companies in decoding the policies and laws governing different sectors.
"We've tried to keep it quiet,'' said the EPA bureaucrat, "but we're using every means possible to re-interpret existing laws to create new regulations.''
bureaucrats, as they catalogue our intestines & munch on them in the
The primary objective of the bureaucrat (3) is to provide public service without political alignment, bias, preference, or interference.
Answer: as the warfare state metastasizes, its bureaucrats will continue to accumulate more power to monitor, control, and restrict the activities of law-abiding citizens.
From atop a mountain, a member of "the Youth Communist League, our junior cavalry" hurls an enormous pen down the slope and, miraculously, into the office, where it pierces the bureaucrat's chest, removes him from his job, and restarts the clock.
Not only are retiring politicians likely to want to bequeath their koenkai to a son or family member, but the koenkai itself tends to be more comfortable with a hereditary successor, who is typically someone who has spent much time over the years with the koenkai, rather than someone new who was selected by the party, such as a retiring bureaucrat.
(4) On budget-maximizing, see, for example, Blais and Dion, The Budget-Maximizing Bureaucrat; Silvia Fedeli, "Competing bureaus and politicians: A compliance approach to the diversion of public funds," Public Choice 100, nos.