Bundle of Goods

Bundle of Goods

Multiple products that are sold as if they were a single product. For example, all seven books in the Harry Potter series may be sold as a box set.
References in classic literature ?
They gave Kim a large bundle of good food and nearly three annas in copper money for the needs of the road, and with many blessings watched the two go southward in the dawn.
Offering one "notorious example," Hawley's office pointed to Candy Crush, a popular, free smartphone puzzle app that allows users to spend $149.99 on a bundle of goods that include virtual currency and other items that make the game easier to play.
A resident may not be satisfied with each and every collective good offered by the community, yet prefer the bundle of goods being offered to any alternative being offered elsewhere.
Developed in the nineteenth century, it assumes that individuals efficiently allocate their scarce resources to acquire the most desirable bundle of goods available to them.
This may not be that convenient if you're planning on picking up a bundle of goods though, or something massive that you might not be able to keep on your lap on the bus.
'Otherwise, I have runners who offer me a bundle of goods containing more than just political items for about RM2,000.
until it identifies a bundle of goods or services that is [separately deliverable and usable as stand-alone and] distinct," states the FASB in ASU 2016-10 (an update on ASU 2014-09).
assumptions is that, for any possible bundle of goods, some other,
If we have all the indifference curves of an individual (his "indifference map"), each one corresponding to a certain level of utility, we can theoretically calculate which bundle of goods that consumer will choose, given his budget and the prices of the goods, in order to maximize his utility.
To illustrate the effect of the change in this article, we apply the provisions of the new revenue standard to a hypothetical contract between a telecommunications company and a customer, in which the company promises to transfer a bundle of goods and services consisting of: (1) a subsidized handset, and (2) a non-cancellable service contract to the customer for fixed consideration.
The proposal specifies that, if an entity promises to transfer more than one good or service, the entity would account for each promised good or service as a separate performance obligation "only if it is distinct." Indistinct goods or services could be combined with other promised goods or services until the entity identifies a distinct bundle of goods or services, which could result in an entity's accounting for all the goods or services promised in a contract as a single performance obligation.
The boards responded to these concerns by tentatively deciding that an entity would be able to account for a bundle of goods and services as a single performance obligation if both of the following conditions exist: