Bundesbank


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Bundesbank

The central bank of Germany. Established in 1957, it issued the Deutsche mark until 2002 when it was replaced by the euro. However, the Bundesbank remains the most influential member of the European System of Central Banks. Both the Bundesbank and the European Central Bank (ECB) are headquartered in Frankfurt. Among other duties, it is responsible for issuing euros and regulating banks under its jurisdiction. However, it is not a lender of last resort, as the ECB fulfills this duty.

Bundesbank

the CENTRAL BANK of Germany.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bundesbank estimates that the growth in the second half of 2018 would accelerate again due to higher activity in the automotive industry.
Carl-Ludwig Thiele, the Bundesbank board member in charge of payment systems, is also scheduled to step down in April.
The Bundesbank's official rate remains at one euro for 1.95583 DM -- the rate of nearly two for one set in 2001 -- if notes or coins are brought to the Frankfurt institute or its regional branches.
Al Hamidy pointed out that there is a productive cooperation with the Deutsche Bundesbank, and that the signing of this MoU aims to consolidate and expand the scope of this cooperation, in the interest of the Fund to develop its activities and programs in the area of capacity building for the Member countries as part of its strategy for the next phase, noting in this regard the efforts of the Deutsche Bundesbank and the important role it plays in supporting the training and advisory activities.
Export companies have been hurt because the Bundesbank only belatedly anticipated that while the ECB sat on its hands, the Bank of Japan would adopt an aggressive quantitative easing program of its own, aimed at lowering the yen in world currency markets.
In the euro area as a whole, which stagnated in the second quarter, there would be a "resumption of positive economic growth, albeit not at the pace predicted by many analysts in the spring," the Bundesbank predicted in its report.
"(A capital levy) corresponds to the principle of national responsibility, according to which tax payers are responsible for their government's obligations before solidarity of other states is required," the Bundesbank said in its monthly report.
This means the Bundesbank believes the current ECB policies and low interest rates will cause some inflationary pressure in the EU in the future.
The newspaper said this meant there was a possibility that the issue could soon be referred to the European Court of Justice and added that the ECB and Bundesbank wanted to legally "arm" themselves for this scenario.
In answer to a question by AFP, a Bundesbank spokesperson said that Angela Merkel "supported" Weidmann.
The Bundesbank, however, expressed a different view in an emailed response to a Wall Street Journal query, saying the EU sanction directive prohibits EIH from executing transactions on behalf of sanctioned people or entities.

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