Bumblebee

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Related to Bumblebees: Carpenter bees

Bumblebee

Slang; a needlessly cumbersome financial statement, especially one that obscures the true financial statement. The term is most common in the context of small Christian churches and ministries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mining collections from museums and other places, Kerr and colleagues assembled data on more than 423,000 bumblebees caught from 1901 to 2010 in North America and Europe.
There are several hundred species of bumblebee, of which about 25 are found in Britain.
Insects including butterflies have migrated north to cooler climates, but bumblebees haven't, although some have moved to cooler higher ground.
Steps may now be taken to assist bumblebee colonies - which are generally smaller than those of honey bees - in migrating further north.
Scientists believe the tree bumblebee, Bombus hypnorum, could become an important fruit pollinator while posing no threat to native bee populations.
Bumblebees will be concentrated on floral resources such as pots and baskets of lavender.
If the optic flow suddenly becomes stronger in the right eye than the left, the bumblebee will turn left to reduce the risk of a collision.
The first experiment in this five year initiative - The Big Bumblebee Discovery - will launch in Spring 2014.
Two separate studies were conducted; first study tested the problem solving abilities of bumblebees and was published in the Animal Cognition journal, while the second study published in the Psyche journal, tested the bee's social learning capabilities.
The tree bumblebee, Bombus hypnorum, has recently colonised in Britain and will often use bird nest boxes | If you want to become a beekeeper, details of county beekeepers' associations and courses can be seen on www.
The Simonside area is an important habitat for bumblebees with 14 different species being recorded, including rare and uncommon species such as Mountain Bumblebee and the Moss Carder.