bull market

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Related to Bull markets: bear market, bearish

Bull market

Any market in which prices are in an upward trend.

Bull Market

A market for a security, commodity, currency, or anything else where prices are consistently increasing. For example, if an index increases 10-20% over a relatively brief period of time, it is said to be in a bull market. There is a great deal of money that can be made in a bull market, but the danger exists that a bull market can undergo a price correction or become a speculative bubble. See also: Bear market.

bull market

An extended period of generally rising prices in an individual item, such as stock or gold; a group of items, such as commodities or oil stocks; or the market as a whole. Because security prices are often subject to reversals, it is sometimes difficult to know whether there has been a temporary interruption in or a permanent end to a bull market. Thus, the opinion of whether a bull market is actually in progress is often subject to individual interpretation. Compare bear market.

Bull market.

A prolonged period when stock prices as a whole are moving upward is called a bull market, although the rate at which those gains occur can vary widely from bull market to bull market.

The duration of a bull market, the severity of the falling market that follows, and the time that elapses until the next upturn are also different each time. Well-known bull markets began in 1923, 1949, 1982, and 1990.

bull market

a situation in which the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) tend to rise as a result of persistent buying and only limited selling. See SPECULATION. Compare BEAR MARKET.

bull market

a situation where the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) are tending to rise as a result of persistent buying and only limited selling. Compare BEAR MARKET. See SPECULATOR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many may not have noticed that the current bull market turned nine years old last week.
As the gold market was crashing, a major secular bull market emerged in US equities from 1982.
Halfway through the bull market, this was becoming the critical question for the nation's mutual fund companies.