deficit

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Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) forecasts a budget deficit of $1.
The impact of budget cuts on the trade deficit is difficult to measure precisely--studies find that every $100 in budget deficit reduction yields from $20 to $50 in trade deficit reduction.
The second group of studies has addressed the issue of sustainability of budget deficits by examining the long-run relationship between government revenues and expenditures using the cointegration methodology.
Based upon Hoeischer [10; 11], as well as the standard loanable funds model, it is argued that R is an increasing function of both expected inflation and the real budget deficit.
But it's a mistake to confuse improved coverage of business affairs with intelligent coverage of national economic issues, like inflation or the budget deficit.
This country has never seen a tax increase result in a reduced budget deficit.
The federal budget deficit shouldn't be much of a problem as long as the economy keeps growing, according to Donald Rowe.
The Fed chief said the budget deficit is a problem because it is projected to rise significantly as a wave of baby boomers starts to retire in 2008.
For Germany, the fact that the ECOFIN suspended in late 2003 the limits on budget deficits contained in the Maastricht Treaty is a very positive development.
This note examines Granger causality between budget deficits and interest rates in a multivariate framework by applying Hsiao's version [Hsiao, JME, January 1981] of the Granger causality method with the aid of cointegration to U.
One of the most important of these problems is the prospect for federal budget deficits to begin rising once again as we move into the next century.
Gibson said legislators could presumably vote to "borrow" this money in a last-minute effort to solve the current or future state budget deficits.