Bubble theory

Bubble theory

A theory under which security prices sometimes move wildly above their true values, or the price falls sharply until the "bubble bursts". It is also possible for a bubble to deflate gradually.

Bubble Theory

A theory of investing stating that prices for securities, especially stocks, occasionally rise far above their actual value. This trend continues until investors realize just how far prices have risen, usually, but not always, resulting in a sharp decline.

A famous example of a bubble is the dot-com bubble of the 1990s. Dot-com companies were hugely popular investments at the time, with IPOs of hundreds of dollars per share, even if a company had never produced a profit, and, in some cases, had never earned any revenue. This came from the theory that Internet companies needed to expand their customer bases as much as possible and thus corner the largest possible market share, even if this meant massive losses. NASDAQ, on which many dot-coms traded, rose to record highs. This continued until 2000, when the bubble burst and NASDAQ quickly lost more than half of its value.
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We described the "bubble theory" which successfully explained the multiblock structure of the copolymer.
Consequently, there would be a long polystyrene block on the final copolymer chain, according to the "bubble theory" [8].
vvBartlett's bubble theory BETTING shops and their 'proliferation' have been back in the news recently, but it would seem the same market forces that have been causing the seemingly daily closures of other retailers may do to bookmakers what campaigners have failed to manage so far.
Those who fanatically subscribed to the simplistic bubble theory are in for a surprise of their life.
According to Wikipedia, the author is best known for his May 1994 paper "The Warp Drive: Hyper-fast travel within general relativity." He has appeared on television in a show titled "How William Shatner Changed the World" in which his warp bubble theory was discussed.
Think of this bubble theory as watching a pot of water start to boil.
If the appellant's bubble theory was correct, he said, then someone could drive through at 100 mph and be immune from prosecution.
In recent months, those rumbles have grown louder and more frequent, and they've spread to experts who several years ago dismissed the bubble theory. The skeptics point to extreme home-price appreciation, which has outpaced income growth and made new homes unaffordable to all but the wealthiest buyers in some of the country's largest markets.
Many critics of the real estate bubble theory consider San Diego's slowdown not a foreboding harbinger of residential real estate doom but a natural and healthy check on a rate of appreciation that is unsustainable.
But many economists and housing analysts dismiss the bubble theory. They agree that appreciation will slow in coming years--and, in a few markets, may flatten or even dip negatively--but they argue that the basic tenets of supply and demand will continue to support a strong housing market.
At most, it lasted fifty-trillionths of a second -- 1,000 times faster than bubble theory predicted.