Brochureware


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Brochureware

A website that rarely updates the information contained on it. For example, it may contain basic information on a company and include contact details. Small businesses may use brochureware if they want to have a web presence but do not offer products online.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results show that many firms in this industry have evolved in their e-technology use beyond simple brochureware websites and are performing actual e-business transactions including e-procurement, and to a lesser degree sales over the Internet.
JBS believes that companies choose the lower cost, brochureware web presence because they consider the entry costs to e-commerce too high.
It's a long way from "brochureware"--and still evolving.
Yet many companies bury that very basic information on their websites under layers of glossy brochureware and marketing copy, making what should be a slam-dunk informative visit a fruitless exercise.
If it were, it says, "at this stage in its development there would be a mix of insurers with brochureware or information-only apps and early adopters with transactional systems that were clearly communicating with back end systems." Insurers would be categorized, more or less, as laggards, cautious investors, and early adopters.
Acting similar to a Web-based application rather than a traditional brochureware (noninteractive) website, the redesigned site displays content that is custom tailored to each individual user's membership level and needs.
Law firms looking to move beyond the "brochureware" Web site approach should begin to experiment with the interactive online tools and social media techniques that large consulting firms and other business-to-business organizations have already embraced.
In other words, a kind of brochureware for the mobile age.
Many of us first noticed this years ago with pro sports teams; their websites morphed from purely marketing oriented (brochureware) to legitimate media properties.
They're evolving their Web site from just 'brochureware' to where clients can get answers they're looking for on things about their products," Yates said.
Many are simple 'brochureware' sites, where companies have simply scanned in their corporate brochure to give them a presence on the web.
For a decade companies have struggled to make their Web presence act as more than brochureware. Creating intelligent, informative, and accessible protals for customer service has long been a primary goal of many organizations, and it is only now that fully integrated content development, database storage, and search-and-retrieval systems are starting to come into alignment to deliver a self-service experience that is a meaningful alternative for a significant portion of Internet users--an ever-growing population.