Broadside

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Broadside

A large piece of paper on which only one side has print. A broadside is used to make an announcement. It formerly was used as a common way to publish newspapers, though this is rare now. It is also called a broadsheet.
References in periodicals archive ?
More recent studies consulted here include Paula McDowell, "The Manufacture and Lingua-facture of Ballad-Making': Broadside Ballads in Long Eighteenth-Century Ballad Discourse," Eighteenth Century 47, no.
The broadside ballad works by transforming written words into public performance and then back again: the texts preserve the record of past performances just as they provide a script for those in the future.
The blues ballad is the editorial to the broadside ballad's front-page story.
We have long moved beyond the binary opposition of the primacy of the printed broadside ballad over oral transmission, or vice versa (though that doesn't prevent two authors in the present volume from referencing Child's dismissal of broadsides as 'veritable dung-hills'), and this collection reveals the complexity of the relations that exist between them.
This is evidenced in my own early book, Cultural Aesthetics: Renaissance Literature and the Practice of Social Ornament (1991), the collection Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture, edited by Margreta de Grazia, Maureen Quilligan, and Peter Stallybrass (1996), my later edition (co-edited with Simon Hunt), Renaissance Culture and the Everyday (1998), and the ever-growing online English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu (of which I am director), established in 2003 and located at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Scarborough Fair is examined using the methodology introduced, as well as a 1597 ayre by John Dowland, a broadside ballad from 1811, and a contemporary song by Asian Dub Foundation.
For introductions to this street literature and its relations to the working classes, see: Charles Hindley, History of the Catnach Press (1887; Detroit: Singing Tree Press, 1969) and The Life and Times of James Catnach (Late of Seven Dials), Ballad Monger (1878; London: Redwood Press, 1970); Leslie Shepard, History of Street Literature (Detroit: Singing Tree Press, 1973), John Pitts, Ballad Printer of Seven Dials, London, 1765-1844 (London: Private Libraries Association, 1969), and The Broadside Ballad: A Study in Origins and Meaning (Hatsboro, Pennyslvania: Legacy Books, 1978); and James Hepburn, A Book of Scattered Leaves: Poetry of Poverty in Broadside Ballads of Nineteenth-Century England, vol.
The topics include the Benedictines and the press in about 1470-1550, transcription and English antiquity in the age of print, the broadside ballad as song, and the scribal culture of the Marian Martyrs.
Teaching the Swernam Controversy"; Sandra Clark, "The Broadside Ballad and the Woman's Voice"; Susan Cushee O'Malley, "'Weele have a Wench shall be our Poet': Samuel Rowlands' Gossip Pamphlets"; Patricia Phillippy, "The Mar(t)er of Death: The Defense of Eve and the Female Ars Moriendi"; Naomi J.
An older stratum in Devlin's repertory consists of pre-1850s broadside ballad material.
In his "The Sound of Print in Early Modern England: The Broadside Ballad as Song," Christopher Marsh traces the different ways that melodies inflect early modern ballads, providing ample evidence to substantiate his claim that scholars need to dedicate more critical attention to the ways in which sound created meaning in these printed texts.