Broadside

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Broadside

A large piece of paper on which only one side has print. A broadside is used to make an announcement. It formerly was used as a common way to publish newspapers, though this is rare now. It is also called a broadsheet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such areas as courts, jails, and asylums, or conditions like indenture, transportation, and impressment represent spheres of institutional control, and their respective landscapes are ubiquitous in the broadside ballads, often serving a narrative function equivalent to the liminal, transitional outland; that is, they constitute places of testing, of turmoil, and of temporary or permanent separation.
More recent studies consulted here include Paula McDowell, "The Manufacture and Lingua-facture of Ballad-Making': Broadside Ballads in Long Eighteenth-Century Ballad Discourse," Eighteenth Century 47, no.
I use the term ballad in reference to those songs that tell a story; this category includes the Child ballads (those collected by Francis James Child), British broadside ballads, and American ballads either newly composed or based on English models.
examined: Martin Graebe demonstrates Sabine Baring-Gould's changing attitude to and increasing appreciation of the role of printed ballads; while Chris Wright avers that many Scottish collectors of folk songs deprecated and neglected broadside ballads as a source, and that the singers themselves picked up and reflected this bias.
In his "The Sound of Print in Early Modern England: The Broadside Ballad as Song," Christopher Marsh traces the different ways that melodies inflect early modern ballads, providing ample evidence to substantiate his claim that scholars need to dedicate more critical attention to the ways in which sound created meaning in these printed texts.
Teaching the Swernam Controversy"; Sandra Clark, "The Broadside Ballad and the Woman's Voice"; Susan Cushee O'Malley, "'Weele have a Wench shall be our Poet': Samuel Rowlands' Gossip Pamphlets"; Patricia Phillippy, "The Mar(t)er of Death: The Defense of Eve and the Female Ars Moriendi"; Naomi J.
An older stratum in Devlin's repertory consists of pre-1850s broadside ballad material.
For introductions to this street literature and its relations to the working classes, see: Charles Hindley, History of the Catnach Press (1887; Detroit: Singing Tree Press, 1969) and The Life and Times of James Catnach (Late of Seven Dials), Ballad Monger (1878; London: Redwood Press, 1970); Leslie Shepard, History of Street Literature (Detroit: Singing Tree Press, 1973), John Pitts, Ballad Printer of Seven Dials, London, 1765-1844 (London: Private Libraries Association, 1969), and The Broadside Ballad: A Study in Origins and Meaning (Hatsboro, Pennyslvania: Legacy Books, 1978); and James Hepburn, A Book of Scattered Leaves: Poetry of Poverty in Broadside Ballads of Nineteenth-Century England, vol.
Simpson, The British Broadside Ballad and its Musk- (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1966), pp, 434-37.
The immediate impetus for Ballads and Broadsides in Britain 1500-1800 was 'Straws in the Wind', a two-day conference held in Santa Barbara in 2006, which in turn celebrated the wonderful English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), which already offers all the Pepys Ballads online in highly accessible formats and is busy adding sheets from the Roxburghe collection.
Lucy Broadwood declined the option of searching out and adding the missing stanzas, even when the song was obviously a broadside ballad and the full text was available in the British Museum.
Paradoxically, the dichotomy between high and low culture is personified by the musician of Barlow's title and a Hogarth print: a professional violin player of the Italian opera whose practice is interrupted by the pandemonium in the street below his room from the cries of vendors, the playing of an itinerant oboist and a drummer boy, and the singing of a woman who is trying to sell copies of a broadside ballad, 'The Lady's Fall'.