Foreign and Commonwealth Office

(redirected from British Foreign Service)

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

The department of the British government responsible for advising on and executing foreign policy and matters related to the Commonwealth of Nations (which primarily consists of former territories of the British Empire). It also has an administration role in British overseas territories. It was created in its current form in 1968 but traces its origins to 1782. The chancellor of the exchequer is appointed by the monarch on the advice of the prime minister.
References in periodicals archive ?
But find whatever it is and be consistent," Richard Simcott, a polyglot who has professionally worked in over 14 languages at once for the British Foreign Service, told Forbes.
I taught briefly at Eton but it was my five years in the British Foreign Service which provided the subject matter for most of my novels, which document the post-WW2 Cold War climate.
His comments are marked by common sense and well-targeted insights which though reflecting life in the British foreign service have broad relevance for New Zealand.
Daly also spoke at the gathering in which he said he regarded Sir William Luce as a pivotal personality in the British foreign service at the time he served his country in the Middle East.
As Bell starts to uncover incriminating information about the mission, he must decide whether to fulfill his duty to the British Foreign Service and walk away from the truth--or clear his conscience, no matter the cost.
It all started when Hague took over as Britain's foreign secretary in 2010, he was surprised that very few officers in the 6,000 strong British foreign service could speak local languages, including Hindi that was considered a priority.
Bridget joined the British Foreign Service in 1980 and was an international trade advisor before going on leave.
The author of this book was a British Foreign Service officer in Iran from 1998 to 2000.
Berzins's citing of comments from a British foreign service official--generally among the most stuffy of diplomats--that we pushed too hard on the human security file only shows that his views reflect a position shaped by those who think we were being too uppity in pursuing policies contrary to those of old exceptionalist powers that do not like to be challenged.
After 100 years of following the nineteenth century British Foreign Service model, it is time to create a unitary, twenty-first century Diplomatic Service of the United States of America, the author of this essay proclaims.
Regrettably, he tells us nothing about choosing an uncertain future in a still-fledgling profession over a secure one in the British foreign service, or about those whose thought and practice influenced his own, or the contradictions inherent in his dual role as scientist and civil servant.
Sir Mark Allen, one of the world's pre-eminent Arabists and a 30-year veteran with the British Foreign Service, discussed during the session the "Challenges and opportunities of the Arab World with a focus on Dubai.
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