breakup

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Breakup

A situation in which two or more divisions of a company split into two or more independent companies. A breakup can occur as the result of anti-trust action by a government or if the company simply believes the divisions will be more profitable separately. A breakup should not be confused with a break. See also: Spin-off.

breakup

The division of a company into separate parts. The most famous breakup to date was the 1984 division of AT&T (formerly, American Telephone & Telegraph Company). This breakup was intended to increase competition in the communications industry.
Case Study In early 1996, Dun & Bradstreet management announced the firm would be divided into three publicly traded companies. Dun & Bradstreet would survive as a smaller, leaner firm while A.C. Nielsen, the media-ratings company, and Cognizant, a marketing information firm, would become separate corporations. At the time of the announcement, all three firms were part of the same parent company. In announcing the breakup, Dun & Bradstreet's chief executive officer said the decision was driven by management's desire to improve shareholder value. That statement implied management believed the three companies would be more valuable as separately owned and managed enterprises than as components of a single company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analyst Dan Ives of Wedbush Securities said in a research note that breakup orders appear unlikely based on current US law.
Using a combination of cutting-edge ground-based technology and new space-borne observations, they have demonstrated the essential role of an auroral breakup in ionizing the deep atmosphere.
Toronto resident Kanye Myers has taken advantage of the new breakup industry.
Just slightly warmer springs with unexpected snowfall declines - rather than warmer winters or increasing river discharge, as previously suspected - can drive earlier-than-expected ice breakup in great Arctic rivers.
Sleep disturbances in the form of insomnia have been reported in as many as 43% of individuals experiencing breakup distress for as long as 13 months after the loss (Ford & Kamerow, 1989).
"I've grown more spiritually since the breakup because I feel that every time I am down, sad, hurt, angry, or whatever my feelings may be, God is there to listen.
Sbarra (2006) examined factors that predicted how quickly people recovered from their sadness and anger after a breakup. Emotional recovery was defined as a point in time when the individual felt as good (for three successive days without relapse) as a comparison group of participants in an intact relationship.
Breakups are notably frequent in university students (68% in our university sample) and might be expected to cause negative mood states and the kind of breakup distress that was noted for adult women (Najib et al., 2004).
John Bundy, a Eugene psychologist who counsels couples, says there are some strong parallels between a breakup and the death of a friend or family member.
And don't forget no-fault divorces where a spouse could owe alimony to someone who caused the breakup, says Frederick Hertz, an attorney in Oakland, Calif., and coauthor of A Legal Guide for Lesbian & Gay Couples.
Brightening is often a sign of a cometary breakup, which exposes new surfaces to sunlight and vents trapped ice and gas that are then illuminated by the sun.
Earlier in the day, the Tax Commission, an advisory panel to the prime minister, approved a package of proposals to revamp the corporate tax regime to facilitate breakups and mergers of companies through tax cuts or deferment of tax collection with an eye toward enhancing their competitiveness.