Breadwinner


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Breadwinner

The person who provides most or all of the income for his/her household. Stereotypically, the husband/father of a family is the breadwinner in the United States and other Western countries. However, the feminist movement in the mid-20th century and increases in the cost of living have resulted in many homes having two breadwinners. Other households have a single breadwinner of either sex out of choice or necessity.
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The team studied nearly 1,100 married couples over three decades, finding health problems in men whose wife became the main breadwinner early or late in the marriage.
Bahraini breadwinners will be entitled to BD5 per month in compensation, plus BD3.
The OSU data revealed that 29% of breadwinner moms participating in the Sharpen program were affected by unemployment or underemployment.
Indeed such a trend of women starting their own businesses has given rise to the term "mumpreneur" - the stay-at-home mother who keeps one eye on the children and another on their new business The report also states the proportion of maternal breadwinners has increased from 18 per cent to 31 per cent, while the employment rate of lone mothers is up from 43 per cent to 58 per cent.
Under the NFBS, some amount of money is given to families living below the poverty line as central assistance on the death of the primary breadwinner.
MORE mums than ever before are the family breadwinners as the credit squeeze continues to bite.
It can no longer be assumed that the dad is the primary breadwinner.
Megyn Kelly, Erick Erickson and the rest of us are detracting from a PewCenter study which basically points to the existing household imperative in America which has made women not just breadwinners, but in 4 out of 10 cases, the primary breadwinner in a household.
The report said the reasons for the increase in breadwinner moms include having more mothers in the work force (nearly two-thirds of all mothers today), men being disproportionately affected by the Great Recession from cutbacks in male-dominated jobs, and more women receiving advanced education compared to men (only 7 percent of wives had more formal education than their husbands 50 years ago but today the number has grown to 23 percent).
The rise of breadwinner moms highlights the fact that, not only are more mothers balancing work and family these days, but the economic contributions mothers are making to their households have grown immensely.
Readers of the Breadwinner series will want to read the continuation of Parvana's story.
Families where the breadwinner is between the ages of 35 and 44 years old are most affected by the protection gap.