Custo Brasil

(redirected from Brazil Cost)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Custo Brasil

A term used to describe the high cost of business in Brazil. Custo Brasil comes at least in part from corruption, regulation, and lack of infrastructure. The term itself is Portuguese for "Brazil cost."
References in periodicals archive ?
While the tour bills for Athens, Greece, and Finland were not disclosed, it was revealed that the trip to Brazil cost ` 6.10 lakhs.
Much of this decline can be blamed on the so-called "Brazil cost" of doing business.
In policy circles, there is a deep acceptance of the need to reduce the so-called Brazil cost in order to grow.
Much has to do with external factors brought in from the global economic slowdown; nevertheless, the internal economic woes of this country continue to stem from the "Brazil cost" (specifically, the high cost of doing business in Brazil is brought on by its mix of high taxes, high labor costs, infrastructure bottlenecks that strangle businesses facing stiff competition abroad, as well as high interest rates).
However, although it is essentially immune to the economic crises in more-developed economies, the country also has a unique opportunity to complete urgent reforms that will make it possible to reduce what is disdainfully known as the "Brazil cost" and to release the shackles that prevent the nation's more rapid and sustainable development.
The ballooning price tag of the World Cup preparations has been cited as an example of the 'Brazil cost', a mix of high taxes, stifling bureaucracy and crumbling infrastructure that make Brazil a notoriously expensive and difficult place in which to conduct business.
"Going to Brazil cost us our place in the FA Cup, but maybe not being in it might help us in the Premiership and the European Cup - but winning them is easier said than done.
At the end of 1997, the Financial Times estimated that the average cost to transport one useful kilogram in Brazil cost R$0.02, versus R$0.009 in the US or Canada.
reacted by implementing some structural measures to reduce or minimize what is known internally as the Brazil cost (capital, transport and taxation), bringing these prices a bit closer to the international average.
TOYS: Kids' Mundaka sandals Manufacturer: Reef Brazil Cost: $25
By making broader investments, Brazil cost effectively could eliminate 42% of its projected growth in electricity consumption by 2010, estimates Howard Geller, executive director of the American Council for an Energy-efficient Economy, who has studied the Brazilian energy sector.
First, it must tackle rigid labour markets, under-skilled workers, corruption, complicated taxes and arcane regulations known simply as the Brazil cost .