Brand Attitude

(redirected from Brand Attitudes)

Brand Attitude

The consensus attitude of potential consumers toward a product. Brand association refers to what the consumers believe the product does, how well it does it, and how likely they are to find it useful. Knowledge of a product's brand association is developed through market research such as asking focus groups. It is used in preparing advertising campaigns for products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brand attitudes are defined as "a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently favourable or unfavourable manner with respect to a given object" (Bauer et al., 2008, p.
Assessing the spill-over effects of brand alliances on consumer brand attitudes', Journal of Marketing Research, 35, February, 30-42.
"Theory and Method in the Study of Ad and Brand Attitudes: Toward a Systemic Model." In Attention, Attitude, and Affect in Response to Advertising, E.
The goals of marketing communication are to stimulate interest in the brand, create positive brand attitudes, show how a product can satisfy consumers' wants, needs and desires better than competing products, and persuade consumers to behave in desired ways (e.g.
When salient brand attitudes lead consumers to perceive that domestic brands are inferior to foreign brands, their inherent patriotism can negate that rational evaluation.
Accordingly, when evaluating a product with two brands, consumers should assimilate their attitudes towards the parent brands such that their attitudes towards the co-brand would be an average of the parent brand attitudes (Levin, Davis, & Levin, 1996).
Interestingly, male communicators presenting strong arguments fostered the most positive brand attitudes of all the conditions, but male communicators presenting weak arguments led to the lowest brand attitudes.
In addition, work on advertising evaluation, in particular the role of attention and preexisting brand attitudes on information processing/evaluation, is also drawn upon (MacInnis & Jaworski, 1989).
These scale items were preceded by the phrase "The pricing of the two bottles of ketchup is...." Perceptions of the fairness of the pricing of the two sizes of ketchup were assessed using a single item anchored by "Unfair" and "Fair." Store and brand attitudes were measured by computing the average value ([r.sub.Store] = .84, [r.sub.Brand] = .86) Of two scales (Unfavorable/Favorable, Negative/Positive).
Future research can assess the relationship between brand functionality/prestige/personality expression, and popular dependent variables such as brand attitudes, purchase intentions and behavior.
(in press): 'There are many reasons to drive a BMW - Surely you know one: Ease of argument and generation influences brand attitudes, Journal of Consumer Research.