Bracero

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Bracero

An agreement between the United States and Mexico whereby agricultural, industrial and other laborers from Mexico were permitted to enter the United States in order to work. The program came from an agreement between U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Mexican President Manuel Avila Camacho to help with the American labor shortage resulting from the war effort. It began in 1942 and ended in 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
The administration's proposal relies heavily on a temporary worker program, which appears to be a return to the Bracero Program days.
Intellectuals and opinion makers within Mexico, particularly in the capital, frequently and vocally criticized the bracero program for allowing the degradation of Mexican people in the United States.
59) As a result of this monumental loss, those familiar with the bracero program are apprehensive when hearing the government speak of financial "incentives" that would encourage workers to return to their home countries.
Nearly simultaneous with the ending of the Bracero Program came the 1965 amendments to the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which repealed the old national quota system and created new opportunities for migration from Mexico and elsewhere.
The Republicans think a stolen presidency gives them a free hand, and Gramm's new bracero program is going to be front and center on their agenda.
The book considers the historical geographical logic of the bracero program and examines how and why the program was struggled over, and how it unfolded, in California.
In the years following World War II, labor vigorously opposed the Bracero Program, which had allowed temporary labor migration from Mexico between 1942 and 1964.
Emblazoned on the lead banner was the slogan, Stop the Bracero Program and Demand Fair and Just Amnesty.
But the importation of large numbers of Mexican workers through the bracero program launched in 1942 significantly undermined the ability of betabeleros to negotiate better wages and working conditions.
In addition to those protesting the illegal-immigration issue, a number of people who said they were part of the bracero program marched to demand payments promised from the Mexican government.
In analyzing the bracero program of 1917-1921 and current proposals for guest worker programs, three major themes emerge, the subordinate economic position of Mexico vis-a-vis the US in negotiating immigration agreements, the impact of economic expansion of the United States into Mexico as a prime driver of Mexican migration, and the neocolonial status of Mexico as a distinguishing factor in Mexican immigrant experiences within the United States.
Later, the family worked for a farmer in San Jose, California, as part of the Bracero Program, a Mexican and United States government initiative to import agricultural laborers to the US.