zombie

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Zombie

A publicly-traded company that continues operations despite a merger or bankruptcy. Stocks in zombies are usually low in price because the companies are likely to cease operations (and the stocks will consequently become worthless). However, a few bottom feeders may be interested in a zombie if they believe that it can restructure and become profitable.

zombie

A company that remains in business even though it is technically bankrupt and almost surely headed for the graveyard.
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North America is expected to emerge as the leading region in the botnet detection market during the forecast period due to early adoption of advanced technologies such as the Internet of Things and cloud.
Botnets have a massive slowdown effect on the global Internet traffic.
income: the owner can simply rent out their botnet to other criminals," said
Since H1 2017, the share of RAT files found among the malware distributed by botnets almost doubled, rising from 6.55 percent to 12.22 percent.
In order to prevent single point of failure, many botmasters deploy their botnet architecture with peer-to-peer (P2P) communication protocols, such as Kademlia, Bittorent, and Overnet.
However, the method does not clearly explain the process of P2P botnet detection.
In fact, more than 2.53 million consumers in the UAE were victims of online crime in the past year, and bots and botnets are a key tool in the cyber attacker's arsenal," commented Tamim Taufiq, head of Norton Middle East.
"It is imperative for everyone to be aware about this wide-spreading botnet, which is the primary reason why this advisory has been issued," a notification issued by the government said.
Once the botnet has a foothold in your organization, it will typically call home to the hacker's command and control (C and C) server to register its success and request further instructions.
Speaking at the panel, Johannes Ulrich, Director of SANS Internet Storm Center, said that small IoT devices aren't powerful enough to generate strong encryption, which makes them susceptible to the Mirai Botnet natured attacks.
IoT devices have already been hijacked for use in botnets, notably the Mirai botnet, used to attack Domain Name Server provider Dyn last year, which generated volumes of traffic reportedly reaching 1.2 Tbps.