Borrowing Costs


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Borrowing Costs

The amount of money paid in interest on a loan or other debt. In other words, it is what one must spend in order to receive money. Borrowing costs are expenses for both personal and business loans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The minister said that borrowing costs must drop more sharply so that manufacturers can make investments rather than interest payments.
Cyprus has the highest borrowing costs in the euro area after Greece, which borrows at 9.
Senior economist at Bloomberg Intelligence, Jamie Murray, commented "Lower borrowing costs will allow the Chancellor to take some of the squeeze off departmental spending and it will insulate him against further bad news on the tax forecast.
1% fiscal surplus in order to lure investors in its sovereign debt at reasonable borrowing costs during the ten years after independence, but the government is currently running a primary fiscal deficit of 2.
This shifting mood can be seen in the rapid ascent of equity markets and the continuing plight of gold, but also in the rising borrowing costs of perceived safe-havens.
Spanish sovereign borrowing costs have eased in past weeks, but only because the European Central Bank has said it is willing to buy an unlimited amount of Spanish government bonds to curb rates.
26 after the single currency was boosted by the fall in Spain's borrowing costs.
In an interview published on Thursday, Peter Bofinger, an economic adviser to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, praised Monti's reform efforts and said Italy's borrowing costs of 6.
Italy is seeking help to ease its borrowing costs at the European summit this week.
The coupon rate, or the interest rate stated on a bond when it is issued, declined on lower long-term borrowing costs, with investors increasingly purchasing Japanese government debt and other relatively safer assets amid uncertainty over the sovereign debt crisis in Europe.
Borrowing costs in Spain, which is holding a general election this weekend, were its highest since 1997 and the same level that left Ireland and Portugal in need of bail-outs.
Cheaper borrowing costs have allowed firms to keep total cost inflation close to zero, widening business margins.