Boot

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Related to Boot sector: Boot sector virus

Boot

Money or an asset added to a trade in order to make it reflect the fair market value of the assets being traded. A common example of a boot is a trade between a new car and an old car. The person trading the old car will usually add money or another asset to the deal in order to make it "even." The boot is often taxable even in an otherwise tax-free transaction.

boot

(1) Money or other property that is not like-kind and is given to make up the difference in value between two properties exchanged in a like-kind exchange under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code.If a gain would otherwise be recognized on the transaction,except for the intervention of the 1031 vehicle,then gain must be recognized and taxes paid to the extent of the value of the boot. (2) Especially in Texas, it is common among property developers to require some type of boot to show that more than money is involved in their business transactions.

Example: A seller might agree to sell prime property for $12,000,000, but only if the buyer throws in a particularly handsome bronze statue sitting on his desk.

Boot

Cash or property of a type not included in the definition of qualifying property for purposes of structuring a nontaxable exchange. The receipt of boot will cause an otherwise tax-free transfer to become taxable to the extent of the lesser of the fair market value of the boot or the realized gain on the transfer. Examples of nontaxable exchanges that could be partially or completely taxable due to the receipt of boot include transfers to controlled corporations and like-kind exchanges.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, when you boot the computer it will immediately scan the program files, the disk, the boot sector and partition table, and the memory of the computer.
* Norton AntiVirus 95.0.a detected 99.7 percent of in-the-wild viruses, including all boot sector viruses.
* Sweep 2.83 posted excellent overall detection results: 99.6 percent of in-the-wild viruses (including all boot sector viruses), 100 percent of standard viruses, and 98.4 percent of polymorphics, for a total rate of 99.4 percent.
To illustrate, almost all of the most common viruses are boot sector viruses - that is, they can only infect the fixed disk of a computer when that machine is booted from an infected diskette.
The program, named "Elk Cloner," could infect floppy disks by putting copies of itself on the boot sectors of the disks.
Boot infectors are incorporated into the boot sectors of diskettes and hard disks.
When computer viruses first originated, common targets were executable files that are part of application programs and the boot sectors of floppy disks.
Users may also now exclude memory, boot sectors and objects executed on system start up from real-time protection.