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Book

A banker or trader's positions.

Book

1. An informal term for an accounting record such as an income statement. See also: Cook the books.

2. A general term for a record of any sort.

3. See: Subscribe.

book

1. A specialist's information on limit orders to buy and sell the security in which the specialist makes a market. The orders are left by other exchange members who wish to trade at a price that differs from the current market price. The book provides the specialist with an estimate of the demand for and supply of the stock in which he or she is a market maker. Also called specialist's book.
3. An organization's written accounting record.
4. An underwriting syndicate's record of activity for a new security issue.

book

In accounting, to recognize a transaction by recording an entry. For example, a financial institution books a loan when it lends money to a customer.
References in periodicals archive ?
But where the Better rules the Greater part, And reason onely is the Princes Art; There, as in Margents of great volum'd Bookes, The little notes, whereon the Reader lookes, Oft aide his overpressed memory, Vnto the Authors sense where he would be: So doe true Counsellors assist good Kings, And helpe their Greatnesse on, with little things.
To set forth a booke without an Epistle, were like to the old English proverbe, A blew coat without a badge, & the Author being dead, I thought good to take that piece of worke upon me.
"This Booke, / When Brasse and Marble fade, shall make thee looke / Fresh to all Ages," Digges argues, hoping next that "eu'ry Line, each Verse / Here shall reuiue, redeeme thee from thy Herse." This redemption, however, maintains a theatrical component: Digges hopes the book will improve the contemporary theater.
In all, Quisland restores and enhances a positive reputation to The Whole Booke of Psalmes.
This page cominge next, declareth how euerye leafe / and side in the Journall must be ruled, and the other two sides / followinge, declare howe everie face of accompte in the leager or greate booke (lyinge open) shallbe ruled, the one for the debitour / side, and the other for the creditour.
Parr sites this image of the Passion in an extended metaphor of the 'booke of the crucifixe', which she instructs her reader to study, as God 'hath most compendiously written therein, all truth, profitable and necessary for our salvacion' (C.ii.).
As a result, Delaval writes his own epitaph, as Hilarius tells us: 'I neede not put his name in remembraunce in my booke, for it shall lyve by immortall good fame, when my booke shal be rotten.' Such knights inject life and health into the body of the nation, and are rewarded by living on in the collective memory of its inhabitants, irrespective of the part they play in Bullein's tract.
(15.) See Arber, 3:37, recording a supplementary leaf in Register C, dated August 4, 1600: As you like yt, a booke Henry the ffift, a booke Euery man in his humour, a booke The commedie of much A doo about nothing, a booke
Ian Spink does point out, however, that songs such as "Come, heavy sleep" from The First Booke are such highly personalized sentiments that they presuppose a solo singer.
My Ladye Nevells Booke has been acknowledged as one of the finest Tudor music manuscripts and is an object of outstanding calligraphic beauty.
As a wedding gift, the Custis family presented Martha with a family cookbook entitled Booke of Cookery and Booke of Sweetmeats.
The first is related to the manuscript of The Booke of Sir Thomas More, perhaps the most significant text in Shakespeare attribution studies.