Peso Boliviano

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Peso Boliviano

The former currency of Bolivia. It was introduced in 1963 as a way to stave off inflation. It was pegged to the U.S. dollar until 1979, when it began to operate under a managed float. It suffered from high inflation throughout its history, especially in the mid-1980s. It was replaced by the boliviano in 1986.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has managed to bring inflation to almost zero, and the Bolivian peso is now stable and traded openly against the US dollar.
Our biggest problem in this regard was obtaining the small Bolivian peso notes we needed to make small purchases of food and small lots of specimens.
This strong increase was due to greater demand in the DIY and public sectors, as well as the depreciation of the peso against Bolivian peso.
At the consolidated level, cost of sales as a percentage of sales increased primarily because of the effect of the depreciation of the peso against the dollar and the Bolivian peso, as well as lower sales.
9 percentage point increase against sales was due primarily to the effect of the depreciation of the peso against the dollar and the Bolivian peso.
At the consolidated level, the cost of sales reflected the depreciation of the peso against the dollar and the Bolivian peso, as well as greater depreciation.
The increase in these expenses on the consolidated level is primarily the result of the depreciation of the peso against the dollar and the Bolivian peso, as well as higher expenses in Bolivia due to an increase in personnel.
This strong growth was due to greater demand in the DIY and commercial-industrial sectors, as well as the depreciation of the peso against the Bolivian peso.
At the consolidated level, the cost of sales reflected the impact of depreciation in the exchange rate between the peso and the dollar and the Bolivian peso, as well as higher raw material costs in Bolivia.
Vázquez said the energy drink's target consumers are "long-distance transport-truck drivers, because it is affordable [10 Bolivian pesos, US$1.
According to Bolivian media reports, they are demanding an annual allowance of 3,000 Bolivian pesos (Au255) from central government.