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Bu

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for Burma before it changed its name to Myanmar. This was the code used in international transactions to and from Burmese bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Burma. This was used as an international standard for shipping to Burma.

In both cases, the code is obsolete.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finances par l'Union europeenne sous la coordination internationale de Tropenbos International, les Accords de partenariat volontaires (APV) sont un accord international bilateral entre l'Union europeenne et un pays exportateur de bois relatif a l'application des reglementations forestieres, a la gouvernance et aux echanges commerciaux (FLEGT) pour enrayer l'exploitation forestiere illegale.
Au Gabon, par exemple, on fait tout pour freiner l'exploitation illegale de Kevazingo, un bois precieux.
Du Bois was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1903 to a family of mixed heritage.
Le bois illegal, fleau dans les pays tropicaux, desastre climatique global Selon Interpol, le bois illegal represente 15 a 30% du volume du bois commercialise internationalement.
Shamefully, many of Du Bois' long-time friends in the US civil rights movement, afraid of the wrath of the US government, abandoned him.
The Seventh Ward Du Bois found at the turn of the century may no longer be the epicenter of Black life in Philadelphia, but Dr.
Bois left two runners in scoring position in the sixth, but couldn't escape trouble in the bottom of the seventh.
To address this problem, Gooding-Williams claims, Du Bois developed a "politics of expressive self-realization," a "practice of ruling leadership that could authoritatively and effectively govern the struggle to solve the Negro problem only if it avowed and embodied the ethos of the black folk" (17).
Y cyflwynydd radio Geraint Lloyd o Geredigion sy'n sn mwy am hanes bois y loris ac yn egluro o le ddaeth y syniad wrth wraidd yr eitem.
Du Bois Religious"; part 2, "The Importance of Souls" (a reference to the title of his important book, The Souls of Black Folk [1903], and the meaning of "souls" as a religious and spiritual term in Du Bois's capacious vocabulary); part 3, "Rhetorics of Religion and Redeeming Lynch Victims"; part 4, "Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism" (which is principally a reflection on what Du Bois knew of these religions and how they figured in some of his writings).
Beginning with Du Bois' early childhood years, Alridge explains how specific events began to shape Du Bois' educational thought.