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Bu

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for Burma before it changed its name to Myanmar. This was the code used in international transactions to and from Burmese bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Burma. This was used as an international standard for shipping to Burma.

In both cases, the code is obsolete.
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Du Bois left Atlanta University in 1910 to become director of research and publicity for the NAACP, and he was also appointed editor of the monthly journal of the NAACP, The Crisis.
De l'autre cote la Chine, oo les capitaux ne manquent pas et qui a le monopole sur le bois africain, dicte ses conditions aux exploitants africains.
Du Bois was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1903 to a family of mixed heritage.
Le bois illegal, fleau dans les pays tropicaux, desastre climatique global Selon Interpol, le bois illegal represente 15 a 30% du volume du bois commercialise internationalement.
It was in Ghana, where Dr Du Bois had been invited by President Kwame Nkrumah, that he died a day before the historic March on Washington, an event that Du Bois had tried to organise 6o years before.
The Seventh Ward Du Bois found at the turn of the century may no longer be the epicenter of Black life in Philadelphia, but Dr.
Bois left two runners in scoring position in the sixth, but couldn't escape trouble in the bottom of the seventh.
Elsewhere, Gooding-Williams explains how Du Bois sought out the "model of a domineering despot" and "autocratic statesman," while also admiring the authoritarian rule of Otto yon Bismarck (21).
Y cyflwynydd radio Geraint Lloyd o Geredigion sy'n sn mwy am hanes bois y loris ac yn egluro o le ddaeth y syniad wrth wraidd yr eitem.
Although I am not at all satisfied with some of the conjectures in Zuckerman's essay and though I find his analysis of live options for Christian belief and practice in Du Bois's day a bit simplistic, his attention to the details of Du Bois's criticisms of religion, Du Bois's estrangement from churches and religious communities, and his willingness to concede that religion was still important to Du Bois in literary and instrumental terms all strike me as fundamentally sound.
In his role as social analyst and prophetic narrator, however, Du Bois himself seemed scarcely affected by" the illusions of the Veil--for, in his words, he dwelled above the Veil (Studs 74), thus with a perspective enabled presumably by" the systematic methods and critical mode of his sociological and historical research.
He then takes us into the college years of Du Bois and explains how those experiences and relationships helped to further Du Bois' ideology.