Body

(redirected from Body dysmorphic disorder)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Body

The main part of a document or advertisement. The body provides the most detailed information compared to other parts of a document. Especially in marketing, it is intended to elicit the desired response from the reader.
References in periodicals archive ?
Body dysmorphic disorder is often diagnosed in adulthood; however, as demonstrated in this case, BDD is primarily a disorder of childhood or adolescence onset and that sub-clinical BDD symptoms begin, on average, several years before individuals experience symptoms meeting full criteria for the disorder.
Body dysmorphic disorder and nonweight-related body image concerns in individuals with eating disorders.
Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by obsessive preoccupation with an imaginary or trivial physical anomaly that is perceived as a severe flaw to one's appearance which requires extreme measures to hide or repair.
The term, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been formerly attributed to wide array of nomenclatures in medical literature as dysmorphophobia, dysmorphic syndrome, dermatologic hypochondriasis, or dermatologic nondisease in different contexts.1-5 It is mentioned in the category of obsessive-compulsive or associated disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DMS-5)6 and if not treated in time this may become a chronic affliction.
A study by researchers from University Hospitals Leuven in Belgium found around a third of people getting nose jobs had moderate to severe body dysmorphic disorder.
Cognitive-behavioural body image therapy for body dysmorphic disorder. Journal of counsulting and clinical psychology, 63(2): 263269.
But for victims of body dysmorphic disorder, it's especially worse for they are trapped in superficiality and somewhat unhinged at that.
Believed to be Britain's first selfie addict, Danny Bowman, is battling back towards a normal life after intensive hospital therapy to treat his technology addiction, OCD and Body Dysmorphic Disorder - an excessive anxiety about personal appearance.
'The less efficient patients' brain connections, the worse the symptoms, particularly for compulsive behaviours, such as checking mirrors.' For the study, the researchers examined brain scans of 14 adults with body dysmorphic disorder and 16 adults without the disorder.
Objective: Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder defined as obsessive ideas about distorted physical appearance, leading to social, professional and personal dysfunction.
While there is controversy over where MD should be placed in the DSM, it appears as though it will be conceptualized as a form of body dysmorphic disorder (APA, 2012), although this placement has been questioned (see Grieve, 2007, and Maida & Armstrong, 2005 for alternative placement suggestions).