Board of Trade


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Board of Trade

1. In Canada, an alternate term for a chamber of commerce.

2. In the United Stets, an alternate term for an exchange, especially for commodities and/or derivatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said the Chicago share through the Board of Trade had declined from 37 percent of world trade in 1985 to about 25 percent today, even while the daily volume of contracts on the CBOT is currently about 350,000 compared to a daily average in London--the city's closest competitor--of about 1500.
Suffice it to note that The Grain Traders does not fill the need for a comprehensive history of such a fundamental economic institution as the Chicago Board of Trade. Those who have never devoured an inviting dessert prior to the entree may cast stones, but Ferris has captured some of the flavor of a bygone era about which we know too little.
Six companies presented with Board of Trade Awards (BOFTAs) for their exceptional performance in international trade
In 90pc of cases where tariff reductions can be used, they are,' co-author Jonas Kasteng of the National Board of Trade Sweden said.
In the 1910s, before the Ontario provincial government stepped in to provide its own settlement of the "smoke" issue, Sudbury had two influential elite social groups: the Sudbury Board of Trade and the Sudbury horticultural Society, with overlapping membership and rotating leadership.
The Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal is made up of some 7,000 members.
The New York Board of Trade (NYBOT) is New York's original futures exchange, where the world trades food, fiber and financial products.
In related news, Standard & Poor's and the New York Board of Trade will introduce the S&P Commodity Index (SPCI) and the Fall 2001 launch of futures and options contracts based on the index.
Much of the authors' case rests on evidence drawn from publications of the Board of Trade, the Home Office, and other official sources, along with the voluminous body of historical writing on mining in Britain.
The swarming blue-and-red-smocked figures in Chicago, Board of Trade II, 1999, look uncannily like Pollockesque drips, and the rows of mass-produced goods in 99 Cent, 1999, conform precisely to the dictates of a modernist grid.
By contrast, buyers have found it difficult to match their own risk profiles with instruments such as the catastrophe futures and options offered by the Chicago Board of Trade.
We wrote: "Something must be done by the Board of Trade to insist upon a large number of lifeboats being provided for giant liners." Even the small number provided was four more than required by Board of Trade regulations.

Full browser ?