Blue Screen


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Blue Screen

In photography and video making, a physical blue screen against which a shot is taken. The screen enables a second shot (usually a background) to be combined with the first image. Blue screens are used in filming to make an actor look as if he/she is somewhere else. This can be less expensive than shooting on location, though blue screens are also used to superimpose very expensive CGI images into the film. A blue screen may also be a green screen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Directly between the green and blue screens were two oversize cardboard cutouts of artificial hands, one a wirelessly controlled robotic prosthesis, the other a thirteenth-century silver reliquary.
And while the sole image is an unremitting blue screen, it is somehow incredibly sensual.
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Treatments 1 (thermo-reflective screen) and 4 (blue screen) presented intermediate values of transmissivity, around 20%.
The closest the company came to pointing fingers was to note that the blue screens were triggered by software that "implements a file system driver using kernel stack-based file objects, typical of encryption drivers."
The boss, behind a 10ft blue screen to protect his identity, replied: "In hindsight, knowing what I know now, should I have taken action?
The role of registering this latter event--however it comes about--is left to the blue screen of marrow and fatness, which records all likely and all remote possibilities, deeming them of equal weight for its purpose, namely to convert everything into vegetation that may have flourished during the planet's earlier phases.
Blue screen technology also allows you to be transported back in time, and walk, on screen, with the beasts.
Hackers behind the rootkit responsible for crippling Windows machines after users installed a Microsoft security patch have updated their malware so that it no longer crashes systems, researchers confirmed.<p>The rootkit, known by a variety of names -- including TDSS, Tidserv and TDL3 -- was blamed by Microsoft last Friday for causing Windows XP PCs to crash after users applied the MS10-015 security update, one of 13 Microsoft issued a week ago.<p>Within hours of that update's release, users flooded Microsoft's support forum, reporting that their computers had been incapacitated with a Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).
In some cases, this caused the machines to display the dreaded blue screen of death.
When it does occasionally falter, it comes as a blue screen slap-in-theface.