Blue Law


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Blue Law

A law intended to enforce religious morality. In general, blue laws refer to public observance of holy days through the restriction of commerce. While most blue laws in the United States have been repealed, many states restrict the sale of alcohol on Sunday, the Christian Sabbath. Other countries have similar restrictions on Jewish, Islamic and other holidays.
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The first clause of the amendment that "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion," seemed to indicate that the blue laws would soon be repealed in favor of more Sabbath-friendly legislation.
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Blue laws are generally associated with religion, and some of the early prohibitions were an attempt to force Christian reverence for the first day of the week on society at large.
(68) Nevertheless, they supported the enforcement of the blue law as a political act of defiance against King Kalakaua, who wanted the games to be played, although he was at the same time opposed to the increased Americanization of Hawaii.
Town Clerk Nancy Talbot said she had never heard of such a thing and contacted Police Chief Dennis Healey, who said the blue laws did not apply.
Lobbyists from both sides have already reportedly gone into action, with DISCUS and the Food Industry Alliance (representing 21,000 supermarkets) advocating in favor of the changes and representatives for liquor store owners arguing against the bills, which are also opposed by religious groups traditionally in favor of blue laws. DISCUS estimates that an additional $36 million in taxes could be raised annually by allowing Sunday sales.
Also in Ontario Coutu will restrict its units to 7,500 square feet or less to meet the demands of a blue law that went into effect in March, which prohibits stores larger than that from operating on Sunday.
Because of a new "blue law" due to go into effect in Ontario in March that prohibits stores larger than 7,500 square feet from operating on Sunday, Coutu will keep its stores to that size to maintain a seven-day schedule.
But a day of rest, which is more precisely what the biblical commandment was referring to, is actually very important to out lives as humans, as parents and as employees and employers, even though blue laws are waning in most places.
In Bergen, malls such as Paramus Park and The Garden State Mall and most retail stores are closed on Sunday by Blue Laws.
In particular the Adventist Church criticizes most other Protestant bodies for worshiping on Sunday, allowing infant baptism, and promoting the passage of blue laws, which restrict the sale of liquor and commercial activities on Sunday.