Bloodletting

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Bloodletting

An intense bear market. Bloodletting occurs when a security or market declines significantly in price very quickly. See also: Panic sell.
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears that successive Iraqi administrations are promoting sectarian ideology, which will divert the nation from the path of peaceful settlement to further sectarian blood-letting.
The Australia tour was so brutal there was bound to be blood-letting, but it comes as a surprise that England's best player is thrown under the bus while others, perhaps equally culpable, emerged with their position in tact.
His colleagues at consultants PwC similarly believe that the long years of blood-letting will come to an end in the second half of 2013.
"The failure of the international community, in particular the Security Council, to take concrete actions to stop the blood-letting, shames us all," Pillay said.
"We are concerned over the plight and blood-letting in Kashmir.
This approach reminds me of medical practice in the Middle Ages: when the patient died, the conclusion was that the doctor stopped the blood-letting too soon.
In Bahrain the autocratic ruling family invited in the troops of their equally autocratic Saudi neighbours, effectively sub-contracting the blood-letting to the Saudi''s with no hint of condemnation from British or American Governments and scarcely a word of condemnation in the media.
To do this, the technician must be familiar with all aspects of the blood-letting procedure and should be aware of the possible physical sensations the donor may experience.
Forget Twilight and those cutesy TV vampire series, this South Korean gore-fest is the real deal, offering some oddball comedy moments amid the blood-letting and bone-crunching.
Summary: Thousands of Shiite Muslims gathered in central Nabatieh on Wednesday to take part in a centuries-old blood-letting ritual to mark the climax of Ashura.
NAVAL commander Nathan Peake is plunged into the blood-letting and violence which follows the French Revolution - known as the Terror - when, in 1793, England finds herself at war again.
The puzzle for her was to explain how the otherwise cautious, even-tempered, and reasonable men that she thought she knew could have been drawn into such a frenzy of blood-letting. The present study draws its deft psychological colorations and its filigree of specific familial relationships from long reflection on the mentalite of the Parisian elite and its most sensitive and intelligent daughters, who felt impelled to provide personal and collective atonement for evils beyond human understanding--evils suffered, witnessed, inflicted or countenanced.