Blood Diamond

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Blood Diamond

A diamond used to finance a war or rebellion. Blood diamonds are most common in Africa, where diamonds are plentiful and where there a great deal of conflict has taken place in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Trade in blood diamonds is illegal. In 2003, the United Nations put in place the Kimberley Process to certify diamonds as legitimate. Blood diamonds are also called conflict diamonds.
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Diamonds that are a significant source of funding for violations of international humanitarian law or international human rights law are regarded as blood diamonds.
The Kimberley Process is the method set up by the WDC, national governments and NGOs to try to prevent blood diamonds - those used to fund conflicts - getting into international diamond markets.
The KPCS Core Document defines conflict diamonds as "rough diamonds used by rebel movements or their allies to finance conflict aimed at undermining legitimate governments." (9) The document also refers to the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 55/56, (10) which describes conflict diamonds as "rough diamonds which are used by rebel movements to finance their military activities, including attempts to undermine or overthrow legitimate Governments." (11) Conflict diamonds are often referred to as "blood diamonds" because of the lives lost in violent armed conflicts funded by the sale and trade of these diamonds.
Is it not possible that diamonds have become part of NGOs' core business so that blood diamonds need to continue to exist?
In the United States, presidents Clinton and Bush enacted Executive Orders banning the importation of blood diamonds from certain countries (the United States is the largest importer of diamonds).
Liberia, Apr 27( ANI ): Former Liberian president Charles Taylor has been found guilty of arming Sierra Leone rebels, who paid him in "blood diamonds".
The latest diamond debacle comes, for example, from Zimbabwe--ever the poster child for blood diamonds.
Hague prosecutors had been trying to prove the gems were "blood diamonds" used by Taylor to fund wars in Sierra Leone and Liberia, although the British model said she did not know who had left the "dirty looking pebbles" outside her door.
It was established in 2002 to certify the origin of diamonds to avoid the sale of blood diamonds from clash areas.
From blood diamonds to the Kimberley Process; how NGOs cleaned up the global diamond industry.
Campbell, 40, said last week that she was given some "dirty looking pebbles" after a 1997 charity dinner she attended with Taylor and others but did not know if they were blood diamonds or who they were from.
Summary: Naomi Campbell's ex-agent is accused of lying when she claimed the supermodel knowingly received "blood diamonds" from Charles Taylor.