Count

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Count

On a point & figure chart, an estimation of future price movements. Point & figure charts seek to identify support and resistance levels. Counts are estimates on the likelihood that a security will break through one or the other and result in a large profit or loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
A concurrent increase in blood urea nitrogen suggests some degree of post-race hemoconcentration although serum creatinine, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell counts remained unchanged.
The most common adverse reactions with Venclexta plus decitabine were low white blood cell count with or without fever, constipation, fatigue, low platelet count, stomach (abdominal) pain, dizziness, bleeding, nausea, pneumonia, infection in the blood, cough, diarrhea, low blood pressure, pain in muscles or back, sore throat, swelling in the arms, legs, hands and feet, fever and rash.
Similarly, in the study conducted by Akkaya and Uysal,14 which was a rare study investigating whether there is a significant relationship between the success of single-dose methotrexate treatment and complete blood cell count parameters, no significant result was observed between surgery requirement and PLT and PDW percentage.
White blood cell count and the risk for coronary artery disease in young adults.
Health conditions that are associated with a low red blood cell count include ulcers in the digestive tract, chronic kidney disease, underactive thyroid, and some types of cancer.
"We undertook this study to understand the correlation between consuming a Mediterranean diet and specific health markers, including platelet levels and white blood cell counts, which can more specifically explain the diet's benefits in reducing the long-term risk of cerebral and heart disease or other chronic conditions," lead study author Marialaura Bonaccio, PhD, of the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention at the IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo NEUROMED in Italy said.
A blood test showed a serious reduction in my white blood cell count. I was admitted to the hospital and an oncologist was brought in because they suspected leukemia.
We also obtained complete laboratory profiles for patients, including levels of blood creatinine, haemoglobin, peripheral white blood cell count, peripheral blood monocyte count, and total cholesterol.
Before starting treatment, the FDA recommends that a person's healthcare provider assess a recent (within six months) blood cell count and repeat the count annually.
The model suggests that, in neutropenia, the tug-of-war between blood cells and bacteria cannot be explained away by the simple bacteria to-cell ratio, nor by the threshold that the blood cell count must exceed.
According to the WADA, (http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Science-Medicine/Science-topics/QA-on-Blood-Doping/) blood transfusions have a similar effect on the body's red blood cell count. Usually an athlete will store some of his blood when his hemoglobin levels are high, then reinfuse it right before an event.
By far the most serious side effect is a low white blood cell count because then there might be an increased risk of infection.