Blog

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Blog

A website to which a person or persons may regularly post journal entries or commentaries. A blog may be a personal diary, a collaboration concentrating on a theme or nearly anything in between. Most blogs allow readers to comment on each entry. Some blogs attract large followings and are monetized through advertisements and in other ways. As of 2007, there were more than 100 million blogs worldwide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, Pfister draws on Richard Lanham, Lev Manovich, and James Bohman in order to shape the reader's understanding of how rhetorical theories may be used in relationship to the blogosphere.
The Influence of the Blogosphere on Policy and Politics
This should hold true for blogs, as many blog readers find reliable product information online, thus the blogosphere creates an environment where consumers get information satisfaction from communication.
The sites and authors contributing to the Australian political blogosphere have changed over the past decade as blogs were launched, rebranded, spun off and closed for various reasons.
Professional opinion on HbA1c testing, as reflected in published biomedical literature indexed in the MEDLINE database, is compared with lay perspectives, measured using quantitative and qualitative analyses of the blogosphere, to assess if and how biomedical information is discussed by the public in the blogosphere.
Technorati's State of the Blogosphere 2006, Part 1: On Blogosphere Growth.
In the virtual social community-blogosphere, bloggers could publish or comment the topic logs in different blogosphere freely.
Contributions to the blogosphere extend to expatriate Pakistanis like Kalsoom Lakhani of CHUP
In this way, the Lebanese blogosphere is breaking down the barriers that separate traditional media from electronic media.
Witness Gordon Brown being asked by Andrew Marr whether he was on anti-depressants, on the basis of blogosphere rumours.
The invisibility of alternative weblogs and the overrepresentation of mainstream blogs in past studies of blogosphere influence points to a need for research that accounts for both groups.
The biggest news is that the trend toward professionalization of blogging, which was identified in "State of the Blogosphere 2008," has continued, creating a class of semipro and professional writers for whom blogging is more than a soapbox or a social networking tool: It's a source of income.