blockholder

Blockholder

A shareholder with an exceptionally large amount or value of stock. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, blockholders are institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

blockholder

The owner of a large proportion of ownership shares of a company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, Panel B of Table II reports blockholder information.
2016), are more likely to experience business failure (Johnson and Milton 2003), and increase the blockholder rent appropriation (Sun et al.
H1: The degree of earnings management tends to diminish as the level ownership concentration (family, institutional or blockholder) increases.
This study considers blockholder ownership which is very relevant to the context of this study; Nigerian corporate market is dominated with blockholder ownership.
In contrast, this study examines the relations between government ownership and firm performance (the terms "firm performance" and "firm valuation" are used interchangeably below) from the corporate governance perspective, focusing on listed firms with at least one government blockholder.
The hypothesis that a nonfinancial firm as the controlling shareholder may induce higher dividend payout is tested with the use of a dummy variable that is set to 1 when there is such a blockholder. Then we construct a cross variable that interacts earnings for firm i at time t ([E.sub.i,t]) and the dummy variable (NFFCS) that indicates the presence of a nonfinancial firm that holds more that 50% of voting shares.
Other important determinants of performance-turnover sensitivity include managerial ownership, blockholder ownership, and the threat of takeover activity.
Schnitzler's finding that the identity of the activist blockholder
Nor do we discuss companies with a dominant blockholder that exerts considerable influence without having a lock on control.
The heterogeneity of goals of multiple family owners introduces unique agency problems, which Zellweger and Kammerlander refer to as blockholder conflicts.