Blackout

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Related to Blackouts: passing out

Blackout

1. A situation in which local television and radio stations do not broadcast a live sports match or similar event. A blackout is most common when a company wishes to increase ticket sales for the event. The blackout may be canceled if the event sells all tickets a certain number of days before.

2. See: Blackout period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sweeney, MD, FACP, FASM, is the author of two books on alcohol blackouts: The Alcohol Blackout: Walking, Talking, Unconscious & Lethal, and Cries From the Abyss: Alcohol Blackouts Revealed, published by Mnemosyne Press.
A blackout, most commonly fainting, is a temporary loss of consciousness followed by complete recovery.
Abdurrahman Othman, owner of a carpentry workshop in As Siteen Street, states that he faces many problems because of power blackouts. "The daily blackouts in this area occur three times a day, with a total loss of five working hours per day.
Residents of the village, which has a population of 700, are so used to blackouts that many have "blitz survival kits".
They do marvelous work, but they are in the incipient stages of understanding blackouts. We have no idea how to treat them.
After the second blackout, an eight-car train stopped about 200 meters short of Shin-egota Station in Nakano Ward with its interior lighting and air-conditioning systems shut down, the transportation bureau said.
Dr Michael Gammage, an expert cardiovascular medicine at Birmingham University, said: "A failure to realise that blackouts are much more likely to be due to syncope than epilepsy can frequently lead to misdiagnosis of epilepsy.
Anyone with unexplained blackouts can access it to help them and their doctors reach a correct diagnosis.
Relating this back to the two studies above, blackouts and large surges account for less than 5 percent of all power problems and happen in Normal Mode.
It's got some of the best bands from the city (Functional Blackouts, White+Outs, Baseball Furies, Tyrades) and some up and comers (Vee Dee, Hot Machines, The Dirges, and more).
We analyzed the data available on blackouts in the North America grid.
But there's one thing on which most of them agree: "We will always have blackouts," says Hoff Stauffer, of Cambridge Energy Research Associates.