Blackacre


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Blackacre

Mythical property used as an example in nearly all explanations of legal concepts relating to real estate,such as, “If A owns an undivided 1/2 interest in Blackacre… .” If more properties are needed, use Greenacre, and then Whiteacre.

References in periodicals archive ?
domain proceeding is commenced regarding Blackacre, A (who holds a life
Suppose, for instance, that Blackacre was originally owned by Olivia and that Olivia made separate contracts to sell Blackacre, one with Amy and one with Bob.
to pay out Blackacre, the proceeds to the vendor--that does not
Thus, while fee simple to Blackacre may involve all sorts of rights (e.g., to exclude people from entering but not from viewing, to demand lateral support from a neighbor, and to alienate), privileges of use (e.g., to build, to till, and to park), duties (e.g., to shovel snow from adjacent sidewalks),
The knife-wielding robber burst into Caledonia Food and Wine in Blackacre Road, Dudley, just after 10.30am on Easter Sunday, April 5.
Newman, supra note 24, at 1154 ("[S]uppose I put up a sign at the boundary of Blackacre saying, 'All persons wearing red hats may enter this property.' If you enter without the prescribed headgear, you are a trespasser.").
against B to have B stay off Blackacre is to state a particular legal
(1) The rules of Anglo-American property law seemingly vindicate their position: once Jane becomes Blackacre's owner, Jane is free to set the blueprint for Blackacre's use and development.
Note that r need not necessarily be Blackacre; it could be one's labor, one's person, or one's chattel or real property.
The 1984 ALI project started out with a standard example that assumed perfect unwinding (Basic Example): Partner A contributes Blackacre, which had a basis of 0 and a fair market value of $1,000.
It's plainly the case that B, owner of Blackacre, is allowed to do pretty much whatever she wants on Blackacre.