Black Hole

(redirected from Black holes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Black holes: Wormholes

Black Hole

Slang; a project that takes an inordinate amount of time to complete. For example, if a contractor spends so much time on one client that she cannot devote enough time to other clients to satisfy their needs, the first client is known as a black hole. The term is most common in accounting and auditing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two black holes can merge to become a super massive black hole.
Scientists recently witnessed a black hole swallow a supersize snack--a neighboring star.
They do this either to avoid being put on black hole lists themselves, to obtain a "friendly" email address, or to fool recipients about the source of the email.
Two teams of astro-nomers have discovered the first examples of large, isolated black holes adrift among the stars of the Milky Way.
Although neither light nor any other kind of signal can escape from them, a half dozen or so black holes have been revealed by their gravitational effects on nearby stars.
The team of international researchers who published their study in Science has proposed that massive black holes were formed from supersonic gas streams left over from the Big Bang, and which then merged to form supermassive black holes.
The reasoning goes something like this: If the two black holes were spinning exactly aligned with the axis of their orbit, they would have needed to shed some of the system's total rotational energy before they could merge.
TEHRAN (FNA)- What happens when a black hole falls on hard times?
The standard signal of merging black holes is a chirp, named for the increase in frequency and amplitude of the gravitational waves produced as the black holes spiral inward.
Washington, Oct 26 ( ANI ): A new method is set to focus on the difference of emission frequencies from molecules uniquely found around black holes, which may open the way for "the search for a hidden black hole" which is overcast with dust particles and optically invisible.
Here, the star-like black hole with several solar masses (or several kilometers in radius) slowly grows up when it accretes materials from the outside and merges or packs with other black holes, rather than impulsively explodes from nothing to something in the big bang theory.