Black and White


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Black and White

Describing an advertisement, especially one containing pictures, that lacks any color other than black and white. Because colors are more expensive than black ink on white paper, and because they are less likely to attract attention, black and white advertisements are comparatively inexpensive.
References in periodicals archive ?
The man's forceful gestures are subordinated because he is rendered entirely in black and white. Conlon clearly captions this shot as a "computer visualization," thereby taking it out of the realm of journalism and using it instead as symbolic illustration.
If we care about how much the two distributions overlap each other, we should calculate what is known as an "age-standardized" measure of the black-white gap, defined as the difference in the black and white average scores in a given grade divided by the standard deviation in scores in that grade Applying this approach to my example, one would conclude that the black-white gap has not changed across grades.
For an analysis of how the fair's grammar positioned black and white as antonyms, see Bederman.
Black and white abolitionists countered by insisting that these claims merely concealed the racism behind colonizationist actions.
Operating on an uneven playing field, black men cannot compete sexually with white men for (black and white) female acquisition/domination.
The county agency already paid for its wards, black and white, who were placed in out-of-county and out-of state institutions.
By the late 19th century the bleak economy had given rise to numerous protest organizations throughout the South designed to help poor farmers, both black and white. Arkansas was a hotbed of populist activism.
Ayers analyzes the pattern of lynchings during their peak, the 1880s and 1890s, and finds the highest concentration in two regions that shared low rural population density, a fairly high proportion of blacks, and considerable migrancy among black and white populations.
Common sense and sound science show that the IQ debate is far from black and white
The People's Unemployed League (PUL), organized in early 1933 by a handful of younger white militants in the Baltimore Socialist Party under the slogan "Black and White, Unite and Fight," was expanding its membership by thousands every month; by April 1933 some twenty-five percent of its members were African American, and as many as ten of its locals were in the Black community.(26)
In actuality, Sarah and herselves are at once black and white, male and female, English and African (American), contemporary and historical.
Finally, these two homes are significant because they marked what would remain a long-standing difference of opinion between black and white social reformers about preferred methods of care of dependent children.
Full browser ?