Black Hole


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Black Hole

Slang; a project that takes an inordinate amount of time to complete. For example, if a contractor spends so much time on one client that she cannot devote enough time to other clients to satisfy their needs, the first client is known as a black hole. The term is most common in accounting and auditing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each interaction tends to cause the black hole binary to shrink, while the whole binary simultaneously gets a forward kick, which is usually strong enough to throw the binary right out of the cluster into intergalactic space.
In findings published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Prof Oka then used computer simulations to show the high speed motion of the gas cloud, which the team concluded was a sign that it is surrounding a black hole.
The black holes that produced the first detected gravitational waves may have exotic origins in the early universe.
It is believed that the galaxy's gasses were consumed long time ago when 'the black hole blazed as a brilliant quasar from material streaming into it that was heated into glowing plasma'.
With the aid of computers, scientists were able to pick out more than 170,000 active supermassive black holes from the WISE data.
Using the distance between the black hole and the disc, the scientists were able to estimate the spin of the black hole.
Understanding this connection between stars in a galaxy and growth of a black hole is key
Astronomer Remco van den Bosch at the Max Planck Institute in Germany said in an e-mail to Discovery News that it's not known when the black hole formed but it may have occurred not long after the big bang that scientists believed created the universe.
In the black hole universe model, the observed distant quasars are suggested to be donuts from the mother universe.
A white hole is connected to a black hole by a wormhole and hypothetically is the time reversal of a black hole.
The more mass something has, the stronger its gravitational force, so a larger black hole has a stronger gravitational attraction.
Astronomer Todd Boroson of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, said orbiting black holes could eventually merge into an even larger single black hole.
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