birth rate

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Related to Birth rates: fertility rate, Crude birth rate, Death rates

Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Successive Thai governments have introduced various schemes to encourage baby-making but, like in neighbouring Singapore, whose birth rate is amongst the lowest in the world, they haven't seen much success.
1, ( ANI ): The controversy related to alarming growth in the birth rate of Muslims in Kerala has taken a new turn with the demand for an independent enquiry on the issue by National Foundation for Justice and Development.
But lower birth rates bring good news too: Fewer teen and unintended pregnancies also are contributing to the decline.
One group of women who are experiencing higher birth rates are those in their 40s.
Asian and American Indian teen birth rates were not examined in the study.
The decrease in preterm birth rates from 2007 to 2014 was observed for mothers at all ages <42 years.
2% delivered after IUI conceptions within 2 years, with no significant increase in birth rates after 3 and 5 years.
birth rate is nearly ideal for overall standard of living, but that birth rates in parts of Asia and Europe are so low that they reduce living standards when public and private costs are included.
The death rate of businesses in the UK fell slightly in 2008 before increasing sharply in 2009, rising above the birth rate.
This is particularly challenging during the current extended period of increased birth rates in Birmingham.
According to the State Statistical Office in 1948 the birth rate was 44 promiles, while in 2006 it was 13.
The incentives include nine months of paid maternity leave and reduced working hours after that in an effort to boost the falling birth rate.