birth rate

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Related to Birth rates: fertility rate, Crude birth rate, Death rates

Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Salamatou Adamou's neighborhood in Limantchi, Niger, preacher El Hadj Sabiou emerges from his mosque to quote from the Koran, "To better propagate the faith, the Islamic Oumah [community] must procreate." Although birth rates are declining rapidly in some Arab countries, six of the 10 countries with the highest birth rates are Moslem.
* The twin birth rate continued to rise, increasing 1% between 2002 and 2003.
Japan's declining birth rate will lower her dependency ratio.
* Birth rates for women aged 30-34 years increased by 4% from 2002 to 2003, while the rate for women aged 35-39 years rose 6%
The pope is urging Italians to have more children to reverse the country's declining birth rate.
Because the percentage of sexually active teens hit about 60 percent in all five countries, researchers say the lower birth rates in Canada and the European nations are linked to education about and the availability of birth control--as well as to increased incentives to postpone childbearing.
Like pregnancy rates, birth rates among adolescents in the United States have dropped in recent years.
Labor did not respond with a fully off-setting rise in the birth rate, as Malthus had predicted, and the effect was a shift to economies in which labor is scarce and expensive and capital and energy are abundant and cheap--though that is not the way populists usually perceive them.
Birth rates have swung wildly over the past century, and the dips always prompt some political turmoil, if not cultural upheaval and increased attention to women's reproductive decisions.
While it is expected that these birth rates will decrease, it is difficult to predict just when or how fast that may happen.
Birth rates have collapsed and death rates have risen, most strikingly among teenagers and young adults.
The objective of this paper is to test the relationship between birth rates and per capita income, and birth rate and structural transformation in developing countries.