McCain-Feingold Act

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McCain-Feingold Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 2002, that changed the way that campaigns for federal political offices are financed. It banned soft money contributions, which were unregulated, usually large, contributions to the national party committees, instead of individual candidates. It also required political advertisements to state what person or group paid for them.
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For additional information, see CRS Report RL31402, Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002: Summary and Comparison with Previous Law, by Joseph E.
Title I of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act not only prohibits national political parties from raising soft money, it also prohibits state and local political parties from spending soft money on so-called "federal election activity.
The Supreme Court has marked the way to do that, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 follows that path.
THEY CALLED IT THE BIpartisan Campaign Reform Act, and it took both parties to pass it in the U.
In a recent article called "Teamwork," Hanna Rosin of The New Republic describes how members of both parties worked together to suppress the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, sponsored by Senators John McCain, Republican of Arizona, and Russell Feingold, Democrat of Wisconsin.
When Congress enacted the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, it acted in derogation of these facts and to the detriment of the right of the people to petition for a redress of grievances through the use of genuine issue advertisements by grassroots lobbying organizations.
The disclosure provisions of the DISCLOSE Act are modeled on the disclosure provisions in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA).
During the first round of arguments in March, several justices were openly skeptical that restrictions on the promotion and distribution of Hillary: The Movie--deemed an "electioneering communication" under the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA)--could be reconciled with the First Amendment.
He tests this theory against 120 years of congressional elections and uses it to explain candidate and party behavior following the passage of the Federal Election Campaign Act and to predict the consequences of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (McCain-Feingold).
The brief, joined by other concerned organizations, argued that the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) properly applied to the ads in question and that the Court's previous ruling upholding BCRA should be followed.
The 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, more commonly known as McCain-Feingold, restricted grassroots organizations from mentioning federal candidates in ads within 60 days of a general election, or 30 days before a primary.
The only exceptions to one-party rule have come from McCain, most notably with the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 and with last year's amendment banning torture.