Biowarfare


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Biowarfare: Biochemical warfare

Biowarfare

The open use by a nation state of germs and other living beings to kill, injure or incapacitate its enemy. There are numerous examples of biowarfare dating back thousands of years. The Biological Weapons Convention was intended to stop biowarfare, but some analysts believe nation states have further developed their capacity to conduct war in this way. See also: Bioterrorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hillman, "Overview: Cause and Prevention in Biowarfare and Bioterrorism," Vaccine 20, no.
I would suggest that biowarfare essentially magnifies these horrors.
The book will serve as a reference point for clinicians, epidemiologists, public health personnel, and others on aspects of weapons of biowarfare and the appropriate responses to them.
Boyle is the author of World Politics and International Law, The Future of International Law and American Foreign Policy, Foundations of World Order, The Bosnian People Charge Genocide, The Criminality of Nuclear Deterrence, Palestine, Palestinians and International Law, Destroying World Order, Biowarfare & Terrorism, Breaking All the Rules, and Tackling America's Toughest Questions (forthcoming).
Human diseases aren't the only possible downside to insect-based biowarfare: The economic impact of crop-destroying pests successfully deployed by bioterrorists could easily measure in the billions of dollars.
Seizing full advantage from the 9/11 event and follow-up anthrax attacks, the Bush administration subverted the rule of law, abandoned restrictive treaties, militarized more than the rest of the world combined, and rescinded the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) so as to illegally develop new biowarfare weapons.
As for our biodefense work, we are not at liberty to identify any of the organisms or how they are being used except to say that they are proficiency-testing materials that a biodefense laboratory would run to make sure they can accurate]}' test and identify a biowarfare agents.
Boyle said the development of anthrax for possible offensive purposes is underscored by the government's efforts "to try to stockpile anthrax vaccines and antibiotics for 25-million plus Americans to protect the civilian population in the event there is any 'blowback' from the use of anthrax in biowarfare abroad by the Pentagon."
In 2002, Hatfill was publicly identified by Attorney General John Ashcroft as a "person of interest" in the federal investigation into the mysterious anthrax attacks that killed five people in 2001.Hatfill, a former Army biowarfare researcher, denied any involvement and was never charged.
The adjuvant has been made available to partners such as GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, and Novartis for evaluation in approximately 35 different vaccine clinical studies in the areas of oncology, infectious disease and biowarfare defense.
Drogin, a national security correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, meticulously recreates the story of a twenty-something Iraqi (codenamed "Curveball") who leveraged a desire for plush asylum in Germany into an inconsistent, fantastical account of biowarfare machines hidden on trucks.
In the words of Edward Hammond, director of the Sunshine Project, an Austin, Texas-based group that tracks research involving biological agents: "Our biowarfare research is defending ourselves from ourselves.