Ecology

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Ecology

The study of how living things interact with their surroundings. For example, an ecologist may study how a plant operates in different types of soil or whether or not bacteria thrive in various environs. Ecology is important in sustainable development to ensure that an action does not irreparably harm an environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
LIFE TABLES OF PSEUDACYSTA PERSEAE DURING 3 DIFFERENT SEASONS WHEN COHORTS WERE EITHER EXPOSED TO OR PROTECTED FROM BIOTIC FACTORS.
We focused the discussion on aphids and had each student list all abiotic and biotic factors that may influence the population size of aphids.
Abiotic atmospheric environmental factors--including temperature, moisture, light, and wind--together with biotic factors affect plant growth and development significantly.
The conclusion of this analysis is that purely mechanical arguments define a range of conditions, or a window, outside of which the ballooning activity cannot be physically sustained irrespective of the biotic factors involved.
The purpose of this experiment was to investigate if these biotic factors are responsible for the soilsickness due to CMAR.
Keywords: Felent Stream, silver, abiotic factor, biotic factor, silver bioaccumulation.
Entomologists have realized that pathogens, particularly the mycopathogens, are influenced by a complex of variable abiotic and biotic factors and by various management tactics that may be disruptive to natural controls.
Among the biotic factors that might affect burrow structure would be the risk of predation.
In a series of papers, Dixon explored biotic factors affecting aggregation in sycamore aphids (Dixon, 1966; Dixon & McKay, 1970; Dixon & Logan, 1972) but also noted occasions where exposure to weather was a main factor.
Contributing scientists review crop pathogens and the role of biotic factors in disease development in a variety of crops and settings.
subpopulations are associated with distinct abiotic and biotic factors, including known tularemia vectors and hosts.
Two groups of associations were identified in each river --a commonly occurring species group exhibiting strong homogenous correlation with environmental factors and a predominant group exhibiting weak correlation with environmental factors and whose abundance / composition may be defined by biotic factors.