Bioterrorist


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Bioterrorist

A non-state person or group that uses germs and other living beings to kill, injure, or incapacitate an enemy. States that use biological weapons secretly may also be considered bioterrorists. There are numerous examples of bioterrorism dating back thousands of years. See also: Biowarfare.
References in periodicals archive ?
A secure communication pathway in association with health departments and public health officials to outbreaks of bioterrorist events may be created between emergency services and governmental public health departments.
Aggressively working to mitigate the consequences of a bioterrorist act may deter the act in the first place.
The United States Commission on Civil Rights has been warned by the head of the Public Health Association that this country is unprepared for a bioterrorist attack and would be dramatically affected since a large segment of the population is already medically underserved.
After the attacks with anthrax spores in the fall of 2001 in the United States, the potential abuse of variola virus or genetically engineered orthopoxviruses in bioterrorist plots has been intensely discussed (1-3).
A number of factors are driving the industry's expansion, mostly the aging baby boomer population and looming threats of bioterrorist attacks.
The EHR systems also will improve efforts to monitor and respond to public health emergencies such as disease epidemics or bioterrorist attacks.
A bioterrorist incident is considered a low-probability but high-cost event.
Maxi-Vac Alternative was developed by CDC to help public health officials plan smallpox vaccination clinics in the event of a bioterrorist attack.
The NIH has received more than $1.5 billion annually, starting in FY 2002, to fund research focused primarily on development of products to diagnose, treat, or prevent bacterial and viral infectious diseases and toxemias that could result from bioterrorist attacks.
But Waxman and the generic drug industry have concerns and criticisms about Bioshield II bills that the congressman charges rely on exclusivity and patent restoration to incentivize innovation of drugs to counter bioterrorist attacks.
Like Ebola and Marburg, anthrax and plague are among the so-called 'Category A' agents, which are considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to pose a significant risk in the event of use as bioterrorist agents.
Concerned about the potentially devastating effects that bioterrorist attacks or infectious disease outbreaks could wreak, many jurisdictions are launching electronic tracking systems to quickly detect such events.