Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, consciousness of biomedical ethics was higher in participants who identified as having a religious faith than in those without, a finding consistent with the results in studies conducted with the general public and with medical personnel (Lee, 2002), and nursing students (Kwon, 2009).
One recent development in biomedical ethics is the idea of "common morality.
The struggle for authority in biomedical ethics manifests Nietzsche's notion of the "will to power.
Indeed, later in Principles of Biomedical Ethics, we discuss a very similar case and indicate that a strong paternalistic intervention can be justified in that case, even though it violates a substantial autonomy interest because it conflicts with the religious views "central to the patient's life plan.
Using biomedical ethics terminology where appropriate, social workers can use the chart notes to communicate insights relevant to the decision-making process about patients or their family members.
In declaring the past I shall summarize my involvement in the field of biomedical ethics and the present excitement as well as anxiety about the Human Genome Project.
Cahill and McCormick focus on the application of this integrated approach to moral theology in the field of biomedical ethics, exploring its use in the areas of euthanasia and genetic research.
Feverishly, my thoughts turned inward as I began rehashing the material taught to me in my biomedical ethics courses.
He has also team-taught biomedical ethics at Kansas University Medical Center summer seminars and is indebted to Planned Parenthood of Kansas City for access to its files.
Thomas Murray, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine in Cleveland.
John Fletcher, a professor of biomedical ethics in the medical school at the University of Virginia, agrees: "I don't believe that there is any intrinsic reason why cloning should not be done.
Yet the heart of that debate lies elsewhere, suggests Thomas Murray, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

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