Ethics

(redirected from Biomedical Ethics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In April 2017, WISH partnered with CILE and the London-based Islamic Institute for Development and Research (IIDR) to create a two-day training program that explored Islamic biomedical ethics, addressing ethical questions relating to Islam that have arisen as a result of the rapid scientific advancements in biomedicine in recent years.
Mohammed Ghaly, professor of Islam and biomedical ethics at CILE, and chair of the WISH 2016 forum on 'Genomics in the Gulf Region and Islamic Ethics', said: "This event is just one of the outcomes of the long-standing collaboration between CILE and WISH.
Caplan, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.
Tribune News Network Doha The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) recently presented findings from its research on genomics and Islamic biomedical ethics at Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU).
The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) recently partnered with the Research Centre for Islamic Legislation and Ethics (CILE) at Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU) in Qatar and the Islamic Institute for Development and Research (IIDR) in London, to support a course on Islamic Biomedical Ethics. The aim of the course was to address the various ethical questions that arise side-by-side with the rapid advancements in the field of biomedicine and the religion of Islam.
He also teaches in the departments of neurology, psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, nursing, organizational behavior, and biomedical ethics.
NIH is still trying to determine if the breaches of biomedical ethics resulted in harm to any of the studies' participants, according to the report.
These are just some of the nuances we have to be aware of." Dr Mohammed Ghaly, professor of Islam and Biomedical Ethics at Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies, gave a presentation about the ethics of the physician from an Islamic perspective, based on studies of religious texts and early modern and pre-modern medical texts of the Islamic and Greek traditions.
Dr Mohamed Ghaly, professor of Islam and Biomedical Ethics from Hamad Bin Khalifa University will be providing the local context with a discussion on the Islamic perspective on genetic testing and genomic analysis.
The four day moot has been organized by the Center of Biomedical Ethics and Culture of Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT).
Paul Schotsmans, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Law, Catholic University of Leuven
Genetic testing without explicit permission from the subject of the test sets a dangerous precedent, says Caplan, of the University of Minnesota's Center for Biomedical Ethics in Minneapolis.

Full browser ?