Biological Weapons Convention

(redirected from Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention)
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Biological Weapons Convention

An international treaty forbidding signatories from developing or possessing weapons that may be used in biowarfare. It requires signatories to dispose of or change the use of the biological weapons they possess at the time of signature and mandates assistance to countries suffering from violations of the treaty. Most of the world's countries are signatories to the Biological Weapons Convention. Twenty-two original nations signed the Convention in 1972, and it became effective in 1975.
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The 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, to which 144 states are party, mandates that regular review conferences be held.
The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (1) prohibits the development, production, stockpiling, or transfer of biological weapons agents (microbial pathogens and toxins) for other than peaceful purposes and any devices used to deliver these agents.[1] The convention was the first treaty to outlaw the development and possession of an entire category of weapons, and the first to outlaw any weapon of mass destruction.
A draft text for a protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention is now in the final stages of development and could be opened for signature and ratification within a year.
Features of an Outbreak Investigation under a Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention Protocol
Most scientific aspects of an outbreak investigation in a Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention context are identical to those of a comparable investigation in a public health context.
In 1972, nearly half a century after the 1925 Geneva Protocol banned the use of biological weapons, international delegates began signing the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), all international treaty that further bans their development and possession, except for "prophylactic, protective, or peaceful purposes." The BTWC was entered into force in 1975 and has since been ratified (or brought into law) by 143 countries and signed (or preliminarily agreed to) by an additional 18.
It states that the EU will set clear political priorities for preventive actions, improve its early warning, action and policy coherence, enhance its instruments for long- and short-term prevention, and build effective partnerships for prevention.Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention.The General Affairs Council also adopted Conclusions on the strengthening of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), in which it expressed concern over the risk of proliferation the lack of mechanisms to ensure compliance with the Convention.
Whatever the underlying motivation, Nixon's unilateral renunciation of the offensive BW program led to the rapid negotiation of the 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), the first international treaty to ban an entire category of weapons of mass destruction.
The demise of the biological weapons capability of the United States in 1969 and the advent of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention in 1972 caused governments in the West to go to sleep to the possibility of biological weapons development throughout the rest of the world, as technically knowledgeable workers were transferred and retired, intelligence desks were closed down, and budgets were cut.
These developments gave impetus to the creation of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, originally drafted by the British but finalized by the Soviet Union.
It was carried out in great secrecy, after the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention had been signed.

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