Biological Weapons Convention


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Biological Weapons Convention

An international treaty forbidding signatories from developing or possessing weapons that may be used in biowarfare. It requires signatories to dispose of or change the use of the biological weapons they possess at the time of signature and mandates assistance to countries suffering from violations of the treaty. Most of the world's countries are signatories to the Biological Weapons Convention. Twenty-two original nations signed the Convention in 1972, and it became effective in 1975.
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is a party to both the Biological Weapons Convention and the Chemical
Anthony Cordesman at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and others, we know that Iran, although a signatory to the Biological Weapons Convention, is reported to have weaponized anthrax, mycotoxins and small-pox.
Chevrier (public policy, Rutgers U.) traces the history of the major arms control treaties that have been implemented since the early 1960s, including those of the Cold War, international and national events that shaped treaty negotiation and implementation, the Biological Weapons Convention, the Chemical Weapons Convention, and other relevant agreements.
First, the CWC, unlike the Biological Weapons Convention, only regulates the development and use of chemical weapons.
Topics addressed include the social and psychological effects of bioterrorism, bioterrorism and biodiversity, interdisciplinary cooperation to counter biological risk, the European Union approach to bioterrorism, types of biological agents and medical countermeasures against bioterrorism, an approach for a biological threat analysis, the position of the World Animal Health Organization in preparedness for biological threats, lessons from the SARS and H5N1 epidemics, lessons from the 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States, and problems and prospects for the Biological Weapons Convention.
The visit comes to participate in the 2010 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) Meeting of Experts that will be held at the United Nations Office at Geneva from 23 to 27 August.
Next, we provide a description of the evolution of the biological weapons regime, ending with an overview of the 2001 proposed verification protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) and subsequent efforts to strengthen the regime.
In the latter area of "security in the biological century," for instance, Power and Responsibility measures the insufficiencies of the current international architecture (centering on the World Health Organization and the Biological Weapons Convention) against the bar set by responsible sovereignty; it then sets out how the proposed G-16 might work to improve the robustness of the architecture and to plug gaps such as local-capacity problems in the developing world.
"For example, I have taken numerous courses at several institutions, kept up my language skills and traveled on two delegations to the United Nations in Geneva regarding the Biological Weapons Convention.
"The Conference on Disarmament, which paved the way to the global adoption of arms control and armaments efforts, has played a leading role during the negotiations and agreement on important international instruments, such as the Nuclear non-Proliferation Treaty, Biological Weapons Convention, Chemical Weapons Convention and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty.
In addition, the commission called for an international conference of countries with major biotechnology industries to promote biosecurity, strengthen global disease surveillance networks, and push for universal adherence to the Biological Weapons Convention. Governments should levy strong penalties against countries that withdraw from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and strengthen the International Atomic Energy Agency.
-- rescinded and subverted the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) to illegally develop new biowarfare weapons; in November 1969 and February 1970, Richard Nixon issued National Security Decision Memoranda (NSDM) 35 and 44; they renounced the use of lethal and other types of biological warfare and ordered existing weapons stockpiles destroyed, save for small amounts for research - a huge exploitable loophole; the Reagan and Clinton administrations took advantage; GHW Bush to a lesser degree;

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