Binomial Model

Binomial Model

A model for mathematically pricing options. The model divides the time between the writing of an option and its expiration into many small increments. It considers changes to the price of the underlying asset during each increment and how that would affect what the option price ought to be. Along with the Black-Scholes model, it is a very common option pricing model.
References in periodicals archive ?
The binomial model for the FLU concentrations accounted for types, hormone, types x hormone as fixed effects, and the populations as random effect.
LR test refers to the likelihood ratio test against a regular negative binomial model of the same specification without facility-level random intercepts.
When fitting the negative binomial model, the same specifications regarding the systematic component and the log link function were maintained; although, increased as shown in equation (3):
binomial model, the basic hypothesis is the possibility of creating a portfolio equivalent to the option, consisting partly of units of the underlying and partly of risk-free bonds.
However, in the negative binomial model, the dispersion parameter is sufficiently close to 1, therefore providing adequate fit for the data.
For the first secondary efficacy endpoint, there was a 37% reduction in the frequency of PEs over the 48-week treatment period in the Apulmiq treatment group as compared to the placebo group (negative binomial model; RR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.48-0.82).
It means that once it is assured that the increasing values of X are associated with the increasing values of Y (from 0-1 in the binomial model or from 1-3 in the trinomial model), the models accepted shall have a positive sign of the parameter's estimate for the X variable.
This one-period binomial model is obviously a simplistic version of reality, assuming only two outcomes.
The general valuation principle is highlighted using a gold mine investment as an example and the binomial model as the option pricing technique.
While the traditional option is valued using the Binomial Model, the averaging process and the additional constraints on the holder's ability to exercise the option necessitates the use of Monte Carlo simulation to determine the EMOP's value.
During the Roundtable's teleconference (see "Data Collection" sidebar), one participant said his audit firm discouraged the company from using the binomial model, as the auditors were concerned about their ability to effectively audit the results.