Binding Authority


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Related to Binding Authority: Legal precedent

Binding Authority

A precedent decided by a higher court. Lower courts are required to follow binding authority when deciding similar cases. For example, precedents decided by the U.S. Supreme Court are binding authority on all American courts.
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Where the case is of binding authority, and counsel is aware of it, the failure to disclose its existence is tantamount to misrepresentation.
"We have over 15 binding authority contracts and 15 brokerage contracts with more than 30 carriers," says Ware.
TAPCO has in-house binding authority to write more than 1,000 classes of business, through A-rated carriers for a wide range of risks, including all types of Property; General Liability; Inland Marine; Dwelling and Homeowners; miscellaneous Professional and D&O; Vacant and Builder's Risk; Liquor Liability; and General, Specialty, and Artisan Contractors; Personal Umbrella, and other lines.
(136) The briefs are not used as binding authority and do not supplant fundamental, precedential constitutional values or the will of the American people.
Binding Authority: Commercial Property, Commercial Auto, GL.
June Ann Managements Ltd: The Company was started by June Kettle in 1986 having Binding Authority status.
(13) However, his most polemical statements against the binding authority of the Bible were ultimately influential for later Christians, who adapted his basic claims to their own unique circumstances.
No institutions exist above them to exercise legitimate, binding authority. All agreements among them are made as equals, are voluntary, and are revocable.
"Early on I got the sense that she didn't have legal and binding authority," said Mr.
The mediation agreement must include the following: a description of the agreement, a statement that all discussions that occurred during the mediation process are kept confidential and may not be used as evidence in any due process hearing or civil proceeding that occurs later, Signatures of both the parent and a representative of the school district who has legally binding authority, and a statement that the agreement is enforceable in state or federal district court.
At the time, Bilandic further opined that "[t]he only other logical alternative is to return to the pre-1935 practice when Appellate Court opinions were not binding authority."
The court found that the plaintiffs provided no persuasive or binding authority that their argument regard to obtaining further consent was a matter of law rather than a question to be answered by the jury.