Bimodal Distribution

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Bimodal Distribution

A probability distribution with two outcomes more likely than all other outcomes and approximately equally probable with respect to each other. On a chart, a bimodal distribution looks roughly like two waves with the waves cresting at about the same point.
References in periodicals archive ?
We propose an alternative approach to statistically correct for drifts in A[beta] 1-42 values over time by taking as a starting point the observation that amyloid measurements show a bimodal distribution, which has been robustly observed in CSF and positron emission tomography (PET) data (12, 18-20).
A primary-interest research activity that could be pursued in future work would be to further examine the bimodal distribution of equivalent GHG per mile for different sub-populations of vehicle owners.
This is an example of the general confusion/ignorance regarding the 2 types of D-dimer units in use, as is the bimodal distribution and remarkably high CV detected in the initial evaluation of the 2004 D-dimer proficiency testing data, resulting in the investigation of D-dimer assay practices reported in this study.
In those classes with a bimodal distribution, it is only the asteroids and echinoids that show a demarcation between modes with feeding and nonfeeding development.
The R package "rSimLab" is flexible enough to simulate normal, lognormal, or bimodal distributions, and seasonal variations of true values.
However, a few methods displayed clearly bimodal distributions. For instance, Figure 6 shows the distribution of results for acetaminophen for 2 selected analytic methods.
Of course the results of two experiments are not statistically significant, but the experience of authors indicates that in most cases the data of pedagogical experiments have bimodal distribution and are not normal.
The distribution of length classes for male mussels was better supported by a bimodal distribution than a unimodal distribution in four of the 14 sampling periods.