Bimodal Distribution


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Bimodal Distribution

A probability distribution with two outcomes more likely than all other outcomes and approximately equally probable with respect to each other. On a chart, a bimodal distribution looks roughly like two waves with the waves cresting at about the same point.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) approach can be applied even for nonstandard positive-skewed bimodal distributions, for example, at higher CVD.
A primary-interest research activity that could be pursued in future work would be to further examine the bimodal distribution of equivalent GHG per mile for different sub-populations of vehicle owners.
001), supporting our notion of a bimodal distribution in consumer stable carbon isotope ratios.
Despite efforts to encourage uniform reporting within methods, one can still see that a bimodal distribution is present in the CG1-B specimen (slightly elevated) in methods 2, 3, and 4, while specimen CG1-C (moderately elevated) demonstrates a bimodal pattern in all 4 methods.
In other words, the games that create the solid, bimodal distribution shown in Figure 4 are also in the sample that produces the solid distributions in Figures 2 and 3, thus flattening those distributions.
To examine the prediction that there would be a bimodal distribution of vowel color in English and a unimodal distribution in Japanese, an analysis comparing the combined effects of the first (F1) and second (F2) formants was done.
Despite the potential differences in sampling and surveillance intensity between sites, the data show a similar pattern of age distribution for iNTS at both sites, with a clear bimodal distribution.
They found a bimodal distribution, with peaks at the third and seventh decades.
The gap in the data, I suspect, is a consequence of the way in which dispersal distances were determined and the fact that the data are bimodal; the gap itself (the complete absence of data points between 1 and 20 km) may be an artifact; the bimodal distribution is not.
A platykurtic distribution is often the result of two normal distributions with similar variances but different means, as often occurs with a bimodal distribution.
One would expect that such a pattern, upon statistical quantification, would possess a typical bimodal distribution of fibrin diameters--hence lacking the classical "bell shape" distribution pattern.
The annual cycle of precipitation in the inter-Andean region of Ecuador shows a bimodal distribution, with a principal maximum in April and a secondary maximum in November.