Bimodal Distribution


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Bimodal Distribution

A probability distribution with two outcomes more likely than all other outcomes and approximately equally probable with respect to each other. On a chart, a bimodal distribution looks roughly like two waves with the waves cresting at about the same point.
References in periodicals archive ?
This result goes in line with the findings of Delbianco and Fioriti (2014) that Latin American countries had a bimodal distribution of breaks, with the first mode in the late 1970s and the second one at the beginning of the twenty-first century.
This is also apparent in the low-GHG peak of the bimodal distributions. However, the PHEV40 often has a higher fraction of miles driven in the charge-depletion peak, which could make it have less of an overall average GHG per mile as the grid gets greener and charging opportunities during the day increase
A Mann-Whitney U test performed only for data of these two prey species revealed a highly significant difference in their stable carbon isotope ratios (U = 0.0, P < 0.001), supporting our notion of a bimodal distribution in consumer stable carbon isotope ratios.
Despite efforts to encourage uniform reporting within methods, one can still see that a bimodal distribution is present in the CG1-B specimen (slightly elevated) in methods 2, 3, and 4, while specimen CG1-C (moderately elevated) demonstrates a bimodal pattern in all 4 methods.
In other words, the games that create the solid, bimodal distribution shown in Figure 4 are also in the sample that produces the solid distributions in Figures 2 and 3, thus flattening those distributions.
Although the data were more limited, a bimodal distribution was seen in one of six censuses for males and one of four for females.
The bimodal distribution of [K.sub.i] is clear because the mean is largely unaffected by changes in [DELTA], whereas the median declined with increasing [DELTA] (Figure 6C).
Graphical representation of frequency of age exhibited bimodal distribution where the first peak appears between 20-29 years, both in HL and NHL whereas, in NHL, the second larger peak stuck between 50-59 years.
Again, only infants exposed to the bimodal distribution later discriminated the contrast; in this case, the bimodal distribution facilitated discrimination.
As for who is using it, Roberts said it is a bimodal distribution. The biggest group is the 22- to 32-year old age group followed by those ages 46 to 56, who, Roberts suspects is frequently sending money to their children in their 20s.
The observed bimodal distribution pattern suggests that the samples originated from populations at demographic equilibrium, whereas the unimodal distribution pattern suggests that the samples originated from a population following a recent demographic and range expansion (Rogers and Harpending, 1992; Ray et al., 2003).
An apparent bimodal distribution of acetylator phenotype in 96 subjects (27% slow and 73% fast acetylators) was observed from measuring the percentage of acetylation of sulphamethazine in 6 h plasma sample (Huang et al., 1992).