Bill of Rights


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Bill of Rights: English Bill of Rights, Bill of Rights 1689

Bill of Rights

A generic term referring to a (usually concise) list of rights that citizens of a state possess. For example, a bill of rights may include the freedom to practice religion and the freedom to vote for the candidate of one's choice. There are two types of bill of rights. An entrenched bill of rights may not be amended without a complicated process, such as a popular referendum. An unentrenched bill of rights, on the other hand, may be amended or changed by normal legislative procedure. See also: Constitution.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Imagine what society would be without a Bill of Rights.
However, only ten were taken up in the Bill of Rights.
We at the moment envisage that all the rights contained within the convention will be affirmed in any British Bill of Rights, but where rights are subject to potential qualification then it may be the case that we emphasize the importance of one right over another," he said.
As leader of the Progressive Conservative Party in the national election of 1958, Diefenbaker campaigned for a Canadian Bill of Rights, which was enacted in 1960 [Chapter C 12.
The Bill of Rights for Airline Passengers was adopted following the conduct of three public hearings by the transportation and trade departments.
Accountability: Consumers have a right to have personal data handled by companies with appropriate measures in place to assure they adhere to the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights.
He added: "We are very supportive of a strong Bill of Rights worthy of the name.
How much does the Bill of Rights really mean to the United States?
The Bill of Rights is a set of 10 articles amending the original Constitution.
The fact that real protection of basic rights has never required any bill of rights was previously recognised by Baron de Montesquieu, for whom the genius of the English constitution was that it effectively protected our most fundamental rights and freedoms in practice, not just in theory.
The Coalition for Airline Passengers Bill of Rights (CAPBOR) has said that, together with the AFA-CWA union, it is urging the United States Congress to address flaws in the current aviation policy.